Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

  1. Kino International's icon

    Kino International

    Favs/dislikes: 32:2. "Kino International was founded in 1977 as a theatrical distribution company specializing in classics and foreign language art films."
  2. The British Film Institute: 360 Classics's icon

    The British Film Institute: 360 Classics

    Favs/dislikes: 77:0. While the AFI continues to make a mockery of itself acting like nothing more than Blockbuster Video’s government sponsor, as promotions for the movies on these lists are prominently featured at the chain’s stores, the British Film Institute has quietly embarked on an ambitious, long term project that will ensure the preservation of key films in world cinema. Known as the 360 Classic Feature Films project, this massive undertaking began in 1982 the brainchild of BFI film archivist David Meeker. Deciding that Londoners should have the opportunity to view a film masterpiece approximately every day during the course of the year, Meeker approached the board of directors at the BFI with his idea of compiling a list of 360 of the world’s cinema masterpieces, collect brand new, state-of-the-art prints of each film and issue a companion book for each movie.
  3. Arthaus's icon

    Arthaus

    Favs/dislikes: 23:0. Arthaus is a Norwegian movie distributor that specializes in artisticly valuable films.
  4. New Yorker Films's icon

    New Yorker Films

    Favs/dislikes: 7:1. "For over forty-five years, New Yorker Films has been America's leading source for the films that matter on the cutting edge of world cinema."
  5. AFI Awards's icon

    AFI Awards

    Favs/dislikes: 25:0. Since 2000, the AFI Awards have honored excellence in the moving image arts within the context of a Year in Review. One of the American Film Institute's national mandates is the creation of an annual almanac that records and preserves the evolution of the moving image arts in the 21st century. The AFI Awards adds a volume to that history of American film each year by selecting ten outstanding achievements in filmmaking. Last updated: December 9, 2013.
  6. The A List: The National Society of Film Critics' 100 Essential Films's icon

    The A List: The National Society of Film Critics' 100 Essential Films

    Favs/dislikes: 13:0. "While there are plenty of encyclopedic lists of films, this compulsively readable book of 100 essays—most written expressly for this volume-flags the best of the best as chosen by a consensus of the National Society of Film Critics."
  7. AFI America's 10 Greatest Films in 10 Classic Genres's icon

    AFI America's 10 Greatest Films in 10 Classic Genres

    Favs/dislikes: 14:0. in the following order: 1-10 Animation 11-20 Romantic Comedy 21-30 Westerns 31-40 Sports 41-50 Mystery 51-60 Fantasy 61-70 Science Fiction 71-80 Gangster 81-90 Courtroom dramas 91-100 Epics
  8. The Ray Memorial 100 List of Top Foreign Films's icon

    The Ray Memorial 100 List of Top Foreign Films

    Favs/dislikes: 8:0. As compiled by a ballot by Edward Copeland and 173 other film experts
  9. Making Pictures: A Century of European Cinematography's icon

    Making Pictures: A Century of European Cinematography

    Favs/dislikes: 16:0. A list of 99 European films selected by Imago, European Federation of Cinematographers, originally published in the 2003 book "Making Pictures: A Century of European Cinematography".
  10. Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film's icon

    Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film

    Favs/dislikes: 14:0. In October 2013, the British Film Institute unveiled an exhibition chronicling the history of dark and macabre films. In an ambitious project, the BFI unveiled a collection of a large number of films spanning four categories, bringing these films to British cinemas over a four month period. Films are arranged chronologically by theme. The Four Parts: - Monstrous (1-26) - The Dark Arts (27-48) - Haunted (49-71) - Love is a Devil (72-99) Although this exhibition includes a large number of plays, professional talks, documentaries, television series' and shorts, this list contains only the feature films presented in the exhibition.
  11. The B List: The National Society of Film Critics on the Low-Budget Beauties, Genre-Bending Mavericks, and Cult Classics We Love's icon

    The B List: The National Society of Film Critics on the Low-Budget Beauties, Genre-Bending Mavericks, and Cult Classics We Love

    Favs/dislikes: 28:0. "Once the B movie was the Hollywood stepchild, the underbelly of the double feature. Today it is a more inclusive category, embracing films that fall outside the mainstream by dint of their budgets, their visions, their grit, and occasionally—sometimes essentially—their lack of what the culture cops call 'good taste'."
  12. Sight & Sound Polls's icon

    Sight & Sound Polls

    Favs/dislikes: 23:0. Every film to appear on the BFI Sight & Sound Poll Top 10. The magazine conducts the poll every 10 years, starting in 1952. In 1992, the poll was split into Critics' and Directors' lists. I have included both.
  13. Australian Film Institute (AACTA) Award for Best Film's icon

    Australian Film Institute (AACTA) Award for Best Film

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0. The AACTA Award for Best Film is an award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "to identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television". From 1969-1975, the award was presented as a gold, silver, bronze or grand prix prize, or in some years, a cash prize. * The 'Michael' segment of Three to Go was the one given the award in 1970.
  14. AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores's icon

    AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores

    Favs/dislikes: 19:0. Part of the AFI 100 Years… series, AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores is a list of the top 25 film scores in American cinema. The list was unveiled by the American Film Institute in 2005.
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