Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

  1. Quentin Tarantino's Coolest Movies of All Time's icon

    Quentin Tarantino's Coolest Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 270:10. Tarantino's Coolest Movies of All Time from Wensley Clarkson's Tarantino - The Man, the Myths and His Movies book. * 1. Rio Bravo (1959, Howard Hawks) * 2. Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese) * 3. Blow Out (1981, Brian De Palma) The rest of the list is not in order and not a definite list :
  2. Halliwell's Top 1000: The Ultimate Movie Countdown's icon

    Halliwell's Top 1000: The Ultimate Movie Countdown

    Favs/dislikes: 93:0. "Trading on its impeccable reputation, Halliwell’s now presents it’s Top 1,000 favorite films. Starting at number 1,000, each entry includes a plot summary, cast and crew, awards, key critical comments, DVD and soundtrack availability, and a wealth of other interesting details. To supplement the countdown, there is commentary from film stars, show business personalities, well-known critics, and the movers and shakers in the film industry, each naming their favorite films or weighing in on Halliwell’s selection. Illustrated throughout with classic and modern film stills and posters, this is a book that every cinema fan will want to own. John Walker is one of Britain’s leading film critics." The list has 42 extra films, because trilogies, or series, are counted as one entry (The Godfather, The Apu Trilogy, The Lord of the Ring, Antoine Doinel, Laurel and Hardy shorts, etc...)
  3. The British Film Institute: 360 Classics's icon

    The British Film Institute: 360 Classics

    Favs/dislikes: 77:0. While the AFI continues to make a mockery of itself acting like nothing more than Blockbuster Video’s government sponsor, as promotions for the movies on these lists are prominently featured at the chain’s stores, the British Film Institute has quietly embarked on an ambitious, long term project that will ensure the preservation of key films in world cinema. Known as the 360 Classic Feature Films project, this massive undertaking began in 1982 the brainchild of BFI film archivist David Meeker. Deciding that Londoners should have the opportunity to view a film masterpiece approximately every day during the course of the year, Meeker approached the board of directors at the BFI with his idea of compiling a list of 360 of the world’s cinema masterpieces, collect brand new, state-of-the-art prints of each film and issue a companion book for each movie.
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