Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

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  1. 962 Noir Films from They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? (including TSPDT's 250 Quintessential Noir Films)'s icon

    962 Noir Films from They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? (including TSPDT's 250 Quintessential Noir Films)

    Favs/dislikes: 74:1. The TSPDT 250 Quintessential Noir Films list contains 241 films that all contain three key ingredients. 1) They were all produced in the United States; 2) They were all shot in black-and-white; 3) They were all produced between 1940 to 1959. The nine films that have been included that exclude at least one of these key ingredients are two non-American-produced noir (The Third Man and Mr. Arkadin), four color noir films (Leave Her to Heaven, Niagara, Party Girl and Slightly Scarlet), and three films from the early 1960s (Cape Fear, Underworld, U.S.A. and The Naked Kiss). Other titles included in the list are noir precursors, modern noir, non-American noir, and additional films between 1940-1964 that have noir elements. Section changes will be listed in this complete list (so the reader will know where in the list modern noir films begin/end, etc.). Films 1 - 250 (The Accused through The Wrong Man) are TSPDT's 250 Quintessential Noir Films. Films 251 - 358 (The 13th Letter through A Woman's Secret) are "More American Noir Films and/or Films with Noir Elements from 1940 to 1964" Category A: films often cited as film noir. These films weren't far away from being included on the 250 Quintessential listing, and most of them contain many - if not all - of the classic noir ingredients. Films 359 - 513 (5 Against the House through Women's Prison) are "More American Noir Films and/or Films with Noir Elements from 1940 to 1964" Category B: films quite often cited as film noir, but not to the same degree as those listed in Category A. It must be considered that in most cases these films contain strong film noir elements. Films 514 - 750 (The Thirteenth Hour through A Woman's Vengeance) are "More American Noir Films and/or Films with Noir Elements from 1940 to 1964" Category C: films not often cited as film noir. These films include certain film noir characteristics, even though - in many cases - they belong in other clear-cut genres, e.g. Westerns. However, it should also be acknowledged that many of these films are without doubt 'fully-blown' noirs (of the very neglected variety). Films 751 - 825 (Another Man's Poison through Wicked as They Come) are British-produced noir (1940-1964). Films 826 - 837 (Bob le flambeur through The Wages of Fear) are French-produced noir (1940-1964). Films 838 - 843 (Ossessione through Stolen Identity) are classified as "other" non-American noir produced between 1940-1964: 1 Italian, 3 Japanese, 1 Mexican, and 1 Austrian, respectively. Films 844 - 871 (The Beast of the City through You Only Live Once) are "Noir-Precursors": films that shaped the look of noir before the style came into its own during the 1940s. All are American-produced except The Green Cockatoo (UK), La Bête Humaine, Pépé le Moko, and Quai des brumes (France), and M (Germany). Films 872 - 962 (Angel's Flight through The Salton Sea) are "Neo-Noir / Modern Noir" films made after the 'golden age' of film noir up to 2002. They are grouped them by decade, and all are American-produced, except for: French-produced: Le Samouraï, Le deuxième souffle, Le cercle rouge, Série noire, La femme Nikita, Léon, and Mulholland Dr. German-produced: Der amerikanische Freund UK-produced: The Big Sleep (1978), Get Carter (1971), and Mona Lisa
  2. AFI's 10 Top 10's icon

    AFI's 10 Top 10

    Favs/dislikes: 74:0. AFI's 10 Top 10 honors the ten greatest American films in ten classic film genres. Released July 17, 2008. Categories are: Animation Fantasy Gangster Science Fiction Western Sports Mystery Romantic Comedy Courtroom Drama Epic
  3. Time Magazine’s 100 All Time movies's icon

    Time Magazine’s 100 All Time movies

    Favs/dislikes: 74:0. "Critics Richard Corliss and Richard Schickel pick the 100 best movies since 1923—the beginning of TIME." update: "Richard Corliss Expands TIME’s List of Cinematic Greats with 20 new entries"
  4. 101 War Movies You Must See Before You Die's icon

    101 War Movies You Must See Before You Die

    Favs/dislikes: 73:1. Steven Jay Schneider's 101 War Movies You Must See Before You Die The horror and the heroism of war has long been a staple of cinema and the background for many different story genres, from anti-war comedies such as M*A*S*H to the heroic feats of combat troops and fighter pilots played by the likes of John Wayne and other screen favorites. Here are the 101 most memorable war films ever produced. [url=https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7249742-101-war-movies-you-must-see-before-you-die]Source[/url]
  5. Berlin International Film Festival - Golden Bears's icon

    Berlin International Film Festival - Golden Bears

    Favs/dislikes: 73:2. Up to 400 films are shown every year as part of the Berlinale's public programme, the vast majority of which are world or European premieres. Films of every genre, length and format can be submitted for consideration. The Golden Bear (German Goldener Bär) is the highest prize awarded for the best film shown during this festival. [url=https://www.berlinale.de/en/archiv/jahresarchive/2017/03_preistrger_2017/03_preistraeger_2017.html]Source[/url]
  6. Brian De Palma filmography's icon

    Brian De Palma filmography

    Favs/dislikes: 73:1. A list of all feature films directed by Brian De Palma
  7. iCheckMovies - movies that appear in at least 15 official iCM top lists.'s icon

    iCheckMovies - movies that appear in at least 15 official iCM top lists.

    Favs/dislikes: 73:1. All movies that appear in at least 15 official iCheckMovies top lists. Last update: 16 August 2014
  8. Internet Archive's icon

    Internet Archive

    Favs/dislikes: 73:0. Welcome to the Archive's Moving Images library of free movies, films, and videos. This library contains thousands of digital movies uploaded by Archive users which range from classic full-length films, to daily alternative news broadcasts, to cartoons and concerts. Many of these videos are available for free download. This list contains all the entries that are listed on imdb with links to the film.
  9. Natalie Portman filmography's icon

    Natalie Portman filmography

    Favs/dislikes: 73:3. A list of all feature films starring Natalie Portman.
  10. Time Travel Movies's icon

    Time Travel Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 72:0. List of movies that use time travel, time stopping, or time manipulation as a plot device
  11. Anthology Film Archives' Essential Cinema's icon

    Anthology Film Archives' Essential Cinema

    Favs/dislikes: 71:5. A very special series of films screened on a repertory basis, the Essential Cinema Repertory collection consists of 110 programs/330 titles assembled in 1970-75 by Anthology’s Film Selection Committee – James Broughton, Ken Kelman, Peter Kubelka, P. Adams Sitney, and Jonas Mekas. It was an ambitious attempt to define the art of cinema. The project was never completed but even in its unfinished state the series provides an uncompromising critical overview of cinema’s history. The information for the selected films of Keaton, Lumières, Chaplin and Warhol was provided by the AFA's collection department. [url=http://anthologyfilmarchives.org/about/essential-cinema]Source[/url]
  12. Film Comment's 150 Best Films of the Decade (2000s)'s icon

    Film Comment's 150 Best Films of the Decade (2000s)

    Favs/dislikes: 71:0.
  13. Meryl Streep Filmography's icon

    Meryl Streep Filmography

    Favs/dislikes: 71:1. A list of feature films (major and minor roles) as well as miniseries starring Meryl Streep.
  14. Paste's The 100 Best Anime Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's The 100 Best Anime Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 71:2. Establishing the best anime movies can be tricky. After all, despite now being one of the most ubiquitous cultural properties of the 21st century, anime, thanks to over a century’s worth of the medium’s evolution and reinvention, is especially difficult to define. From the five-minute shorts of Oten Shimokawa in 1917, to the feature-length animations produced during World War II, to the pioneering production cycles of Tezuka in the ’60s and the auteurist innovations of the likes of Miyazaki and many others towards the latter half of the last century, anime has morphed through countless phases. Amateur efforts, nationalist propaganda fodder, niche cultural export turned eventual global phenomenon: Each iteration conforms to the shape of the times in which it was produced. Television expanded the medium during the 1960s, birthing many of the essential genres and subgenres that we know today and forming the impetus for the anime industry’s inextricable relationship to advertising and merchandising from the 1970s onward. The arrival of home video catapulted anime to its commercial and aesthetic apex, fanning outward from island nation of Nippon to the far shores of North America and back, before again being revolutionized by the unprecedented accessibility of the world wide web throughout the ’90s and early aughts. Anime film owes much to the evolving means of production and distribution throughout the late 20th century, the breadth and audacity of the medium’s content widening and contracting along with its running time to cater to the emerging palettes of audiences both new and old, at home and abroad. But where does one begin to tackle the aesthetic and historical precedent that anime film has left on pop culture and global entertainment in the last century? This list is an attempt to do just that: to create a primer of 100 of the most influential and essential films that Japanese animation has produced, and to offer a thorough aesthetic, technical and historical breakdown of why these film matter. With that aim in mind, Paste is proud to enlist the curatorial talents of Jason DeMarco, on-air creative director of Adult Swim and co-creator of Toonami, whose unique role in anime’s emerging popularity in the West has helped to hone this list. Given the shared evolution between anime film and television and the aforementioned significance of the home video revolution, this list includes not only traditional features but also original video animations made for home video (OVAs) and anthology films— with the stipulation of each entry having at some point premiered in theaters. It is our hope that in creating this list we have created an entry point for both the expert and the layperson to trace the rich history of anime’s legacy on both film and popular culture, and to offer newcomers a comprehensive guide through to learn, rediscover, and explore the fullness that the genre of Japanese animation has to offer now and into the future. [url=https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/01/the-100-best-anime-movies-of-all-time.html?a=1]Source[/url]
  15. CollegeHumor.com's Top 100 Comedy Movies of All Time's icon

    CollegeHumor.com's Top 100 Comedy Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 70:5. Forget what the American Film Institute or your film professors have to say. They’re just boring old people! We asked YOU, people reading CollegeHumor, to vote on your favorite comedies and we have compiled the definitive list of The 100 Best Comedies of All Time (according to people who actually watch comedies, and not the aforementioned old people).
  16. Monty's Top Samurai Movies's icon

    Monty's Top Samurai Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 70:9. The list before your is the fruit of many years of reading about and watching samurai cinema. Moreover, as my main focus is on jidai-geki (i.e. Japanese period films set before 1868), and more specifically chanbara or sword fighting films, no crazy robot samurai anime will ever find its way here. The list will be expanded as I come across new goodies. All the titles in the list are available with English subs. Apart from the first ten titles, this list is unranked. Hiroshi Inagaki's Miyamoto Musashi trilogy is not included here as I find Tomu Uchida's six part treatment of the same story vastly superior. In case anyone misses the Zatoichi films here, it's because they fall loosely into the genre of ninkyo-eiga. The one film in this great series I have included is that in which Zatoichi has this epic showdown against a samurai. For discussion, reviews and even more viewing suggestions, check out the samurai film challenge thread here: [url]http://s15.zetaboards.com/iCheckMovies/topic/7264539/1/[/url] -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cette liste est le résultat de plusieurs années de lecture et de visionnage de films de samouraïs. Mon intention ayant été de me focaliser sur les films de chanbara classiques, vous n'y trouverez ici jamais aucun anime de robot fou samouraï. Si la trilogie sur Miyamoto Musashi de Hiroshi Inagaki ne figure pas dans la liste, c'est qu'il me semble que la version en six parties de Tomu Uchida lui est immensément supérieure.Vous n'y trouverez pas plus les films sur Zatoichi, la série correspondant plutôt au sous-genre ninkyo-eiga (littéralement "film de chevalerie"); le seul de ces films figurant dans la liste concerne celui où Zatoichi affronte un samouraï dans un duel mémorable.
  17. One hundred film and one country, Italy's icon

    One hundred film and one country, Italy

    Favs/dislikes: 70:5. In 2008, for the 65th Venice film festival, a panel led by Italian film critic Fabio Ferzetti chose 100 Italian films made between 1942 and 1978 that they deemed essential to Italian cinema. [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/100_film_italiani_da_salvare]Source[/url]
  18. Tim Dirks' Most Controversial Films of All-Time's icon

    Tim Dirks' Most Controversial Films of All-Time

    Favs/dislikes: 69:2. Films always have the ability to anger us, divide us, shock us, disgust us, and more. Usually, films that inspire controversy, outright boycotting, picketing, banning, censorship, or protest have graphic sex, violence, homosexuality, religious, political or race-related themes and content. They usually push the envelope regarding what can be filmed and displayed on the screen, and are considered taboo, "immoral" or "obscene" due to language, drug use, violence and sensuality/nudity or other incendiary elements. Inevitably, controversy helps to publicize these films and fuel the box-office receipts. [url=http://www.filmsite.org/controversialfilms.html]Source[/url]
  19. 101 Sci-fi Movies You Must See Before You Die's icon

    101 Sci-fi Movies You Must See Before You Die

    Favs/dislikes: 68:0. From the book by Steven Jay Schneider
  20. Academy Award Cartoons & Animated Shorts's icon

    Academy Award Cartoons & Animated Shorts

    Favs/dislikes: 68:1. Beginning in the 1931-1932 Oscars, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has honored outstanding achievements in animated short subjects. Last updated: February 25, 2019.
  21. David Lean Filmography's icon

    David Lean Filmography

    Favs/dislikes: 68:0. British director David Lean's work spans from small romances, like Brief Encounter, to grand epics, like Lawrence of Arabia.
  22. iCM Forum's Top 250 Favourite Horror Films's icon

    iCM Forum's Top 250 Favourite Horror Films

    Favs/dislikes: 68:0. As voted by the iCM forum. All nominated films can be found [url=https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/icm+forums+favourite+horror+films+all+nominations/mightysparks/]here[/url].
  23. Marx Brothers Movies's icon

    Marx Brothers Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 68:2. Chronological listing of films featuring the famous comedy team.
  24. Tom Hanks Filmography's icon

    Tom Hanks Filmography

    Favs/dislikes: 68:3. The always likable Tom Hanks' films.
  25. Fangoria's 101 Best Horror Films You've Never Seen's icon

    Fangoria's 101 Best Horror Films You've Never Seen

    Favs/dislikes: 67:0.
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