Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

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  1. Ç r e a † i v e [&] µ n u s u a Ꮭ's icon

    Ç r e a † i v e [&] µ n u s u a Ꮭ

    Favs/dislikes: 65:2. ▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀ [b]༄ ᗅ ⅅᎥverse ᏕelectᎥon ࿔f ƒᎥ⎳ms that are notable ƒor ƒantastᎥc, ᏕublᎥme, or ᏏᎥzarre Ꭵmagerу [/b] ▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀ [img]http://fourfour.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451b8c369e20120a7f62e82970b-pi[/img] [Since IMDb and icheck both exclude (most) music videos, I have made a [url=https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLv7Xe0uN2G_pYhFvCbntWGBIyBvMfg4Nk]companion list[/url] for this neglected format at YouTube.]
  2. Quirky's icon

    Quirky

    Favs/dislikes: 63:1. Unconventional films where the characters tend to obtain peculiar characteristics, habits, mannerisms, and/or personalities. This collection includes eccentric, bizarre, far out, idiosyncratic, odd, off-the-wall, out of the ordinary, outre, peculiar, strange, unconventional, unorthodox, unusual, wacky, way-out, and weird films. If you like this list, please favourite it. Suggestions are welcome :)
  3. Ronny's Top 99 Arthouse Films's icon

    Ronny's Top 99 Arthouse Films

    Favs/dislikes: 22:0. There are way too many arthouse / surreal / artistic films out there to know where the hell to start. Even if you've watched them for years you can still get lost in the searching. One of the reasons why we started Film Bizarro was to highlight the weird for the masses, and while I think we have done that, we've also gotten wider. That's why I wanted to make this list - to make a list that focuses on only the good of the weird. I decided to call it my "Favorite Arthouse Films" because I think "Arthouse" is a word that sums it up perfectly even though the origins of the word might not apply to 100%. I've tried to write a good but short description for each film - it's just too much work to write a full review for each of these so bare with me. There are some fascinating films in this list and sometimes words just doesn't do it, at least not with my limited vocabulary, so don't judge them solely on what I have to say. If you find a film of interest: watch it! I decided to only include 3 movies from the same director, otherwise some directors would take up too much space. This list consists of films that are my favorites, I'm not claiming they are the best. Simply being weird doesn't do it!! When I decided to make this list I took it upon myself to watch a few films I have missed out on - LOTS and LOTS of films didn't make it, but some of them did. This of course means that in 6 months maybe the list would've looked slightly different, as I watch movies all the time. This documents the time when it was made, and I assure you that's good enough! Five of the movies are missing from IMDb. Missing from IMDb: #78. Tephrasect (Justin Curfman, 2004) #68. Ass (Usama Alshaibi, 2001) #61. I Never Left The White Room (Michael Todd Schneider, 2007) #30. ...and then i helped (Michael Todd Schneider, 2010) #15. Convulsion Expulsion (Usama Alshaibi, 2003)
  4. J-Horror: An Alternative Guide's icon

    J-Horror: An Alternative Guide

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. There's a lot more to Japanese horror than the vengeful, lank-haired spook-girls of Ring, Ju-on and their legion of imitators. Sure, the West may have only recently woken up to its charms, but J-horror has been around for a mighty long time. The first Japanese novel, The Tale of Genji – now nearly a millennium old – is positively packed with ghosts and gruesome revenge. Noh and Kabuki are some of the most haunted theatrical traditions on Earth, and Edo period playwrights were constantly fighting to outdo one another in the gore, murder and supernatural vengeance stakes. Pretty much as soon as the first motion picture camera came off the boat here, someone picked it up and started making horror movies. Jizo the Spook [Bake Jizo] and Resurrection of a Corpse [Shinin no Sosei], both filmed in 1898, predate Nosferatu (1922) by decades. Since then, Japanese horror has come to us in a number of guises: sometimes grotesque, sometimes scary, sometimes erotic, funny or even beautiful. Let's take a look at a few examples...
  5. The Flabbergasters: Strangest Films Ever Made's icon

    The Flabbergasters: Strangest Films Ever Made

    Favs/dislikes: 1:1. These are films that I want everyone to see because they are so insane, bizarre and unfathomable that people think I dreamed them or misremember them.
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