Official lists

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  1. 100 American Independent Films (BFI Screen Guide)'s icon

    100 American Independent Films (BFI Screen Guide)

    Favs/dislikes: 57:1. The top 100 American independent films as selected by Jason Wood, author of BFI Screen Guides' "100 American Independent Films."
  2. 100 Animated Feature Films (BFI Screen Guides)'s icon

    100 Animated Feature Films (BFI Screen Guides)

    Favs/dislikes: 157:5. This list is from Andrew Osmond's book [url=http://filmstore.bfi.org.uk/acatalog/info_17635.html]100 Animated Feature Films[/url] (2011). "Andrew Osmond provides an entertaining and illuminating guide to the endlessly diverse styles, cultures, and visions of the genre, with entires on 100 of the most interesting and important animated films from around the world, from the 1920s to the present day." [url=http://shop.bfi.org.uk/books/100-animated-feature-films-book.html#.Wgyw3GhSzIU]Source[/url]
  3. 100 Best British films's icon

    100 Best British films

    Favs/dislikes: 191:1. The 100 best British films as chosen by a panel of 150 film industry experts, including directors Sam Mendes, Mike Leigh, Ken Loach and Wes Anderson, actors David Morrissey, Sally Hawkins and Thandie Newton, newspaper and magazine critics and the heads of the UK's major cultural organisations. [url=https://www.timeout.com/london/film/100-best-british-films]Source[/url]
  4. 100 Classic Martial Arts Films's icon

    100 Classic Martial Arts Films

    Favs/dislikes: 56:2. The best martial arts films, selected by critic Wei Jun Zi and published on Sohu.com in 2008. [url=http://yule.sohu.com/s2008/100gf/]Source[/url]
  5. 100 Documentary Films (BFI Screen Guide)'s icon

    100 Documentary Films (BFI Screen Guide)

    Favs/dislikes: 115:1. "100 Documentary Films is the first book to offer concise and authoritative individual critical commentaries on some of the key documentary films - from the Lumière brothers and the beginnings of cinema through to recent films such as Bowling for Columbine and When the Levees Broke - and is global in perspective. Many different types of documentary are discussed, as well as films by major documentary directors, including Robert Flaherty, Humphrey Jennings, Jean Rouch, Dziga Vertov, Errol Morris, Nick Broomfield and Michael Moore. Each entry provides concise critical analysis, while frequent cross reference to other films featured helps to place films in their historical and aesthetic contexts." [url=http://shop.bfi.org.uk/100-documentary-films.html#.WgywgGhSzIU]Source[/url]
  6. 100 Greatest Films of Australian Cinema's icon

    100 Greatest Films of Australian Cinema

    Favs/dislikes: 63:3. From the book by Scott Hocking. From indigenous issues and rites of passage, to sexual repression, mateship, larrikins and more, Australian films provide a cultural snapshot of our sunburnt country, as seen through the lenses of some of the world’s finest filmmakers. [url=https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6284687-100-greatest-films-of-australian-cinema]Source[/url]
  7. 100 Korean Films's icon

    100 Korean Films

    Favs/dislikes: 43:3. In 2013, the Korean Film Archive asked 62 film scholars, professors, critics and curators to vote for the top 100 Korean films. The top 12 is ranked and the rest is in chronological order. 3 films tied for 1st place. [url=https://eng.koreafilm.or.kr/kofa/publication/books/PB_0000000170?page=&year=]Source[/url] KOFA previously made a list of the [url=https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/kofas+100+korean+films+1936-1996/mjf314/]top 100 Korean films from 1936-1996[/url].
  8. 100 Korean Masterpieces by Film 2.0 (2008 Edition)'s icon

    100 Korean Masterpieces by Film 2.0 (2008 Edition)

    Favs/dislikes: 87:1. Note that Arirang (#24) is considered a lost film, though there are rumors of an existing copy in personal collections.
  9. 100 Musicals (BFI Screen Guide)'s icon

    100 Musicals (BFI Screen Guide)

    Favs/dislikes: 64:2. "From the coming of sound to the 1960s, the musical was central to Hollywood production. Exhibiting – often in spectacular fashion – the remarkable resources of the Hollywood studios, musicals came to epitomise the very idea of 'light entertainment'. Films like Top Hat and 42nd Street, Meet Me in St. Louis and On the Town, Singin' in the Rain and Oklahoma!, West Side Story and The Sound of Music were hugely popular, yet were commonly regarded by cultural commentators as trivial and escapist. It was the 1970s before serious study of the Hollywood musical began to change critical attitudes and foster an interest in musical films produced in other cultures. Hollywood musicals have become less common, but the genre persists and both academic interest in and fond nostalgia for the musical shows no signs of abating. 100 Film Musicals provides a stimulating overview of the genre's development, its major themes and the critical debates it has provoked. While centred on the dominant Hollywood tradition, 100 Film Musicals includes films from countries that often tried to emulate the Hollywood style, like Britain and Germany, as well as from very different cultures like India, Egypt and Japan. Jim Hillier and Douglas Pye also discuss post-1960s films from many different sources which adapt and reflect on the conventions of the genre, including recent examples such as Moulin Rouge! and High School Musical, demonstrating that the genre is still very much alive." [url=http://shop.bfi.org.uk/books/bfi-screen-guides/100-film-musical-book.html#.Wg3fhGhSzIU]Source[/url]
  10. 100 Must-See Films Of The 20th Century's icon

    100 Must-See Films Of The 20th Century

    Favs/dislikes: 158:1. A list of the 100 20th century films as chosen by the film critic Leonard Maltin. This list appears in Maltin's book titled Leonard Maltin's Movie and Video Guide 2000 (Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide). [url=http://www.filmsite.org/maltin.html]Source[/url]
  11. 100 Road Movies (BFI Screen Guide)'s icon

    100 Road Movies (BFI Screen Guide)

    Favs/dislikes: 52:0. From the earliest days of American cinema, the road movie has been synonymous with American culture and the image America has presented both to itself and the world. But the road movie is not uniquely American, and other national cinemas have offered their own take, adapting it to reflect their own sensibilities and geographies. Whatever its nationality, the road movie has presented a means by which to challenge and confront convention, remaining an ever-changing, fascinating metaphor for life. Beginning with an expansive essay tracing its historical development, "100 Road Movies" provides a comprehensive guide to the development of what is perhaps one of the most enduring, popular, and reflexive of sub-genres.
  12. 100 Science Fiction Films (BFI Screen Guide)'s icon

    100 Science Fiction Films (BFI Screen Guide)

    Favs/dislikes: 91:1. "Since its explosion in the 1950s, science fiction has become one of the most popular film genres, with numerous dedicated fan conventions, academic conferences, websites, magazines, journals, book clubs, memorabilia and collectibles. Once relegated to B budget status, today's science fiction films are often blockbuster productions, featuring major stars. Despite its high profile, science fiction is notoriously difficult to define. In his introduction to 100 Science Fiction Films, Barry Keith Grant explains the genre's complexities, while also providing an overview of its history, suggesting that the cinema is an ideal medium for conveying the 'sense of wonder' that critics have argued is central to the genre. From Georges Melies's Le Voyage dans la lune (1902), to the blockbusters of the 1970s that dramatically changed Hollywood, to the major releases of the past few years, the films featured in this book represent a range of periods, countries and types (including alien invasion, space travel, time travel, apocalypse, monsters and anime), and cover the key directors and writers. 100 Science Fiction Films provides a lively and illuminating guide to the genre from the beginning of film history to the present, taking the reader on a comprehensive tour through the rich and varied alternate universe of sci-fi cinema." [url=http://shop.bfi.org.uk/100-science-fiction-films-book.html#.Wg3hHmhSzIU]Source[/url]
  13. 100 Westerns (BFI Screen Guide)'s icon

    100 Westerns (BFI Screen Guide)

    Favs/dislikes: 49:1. "Addresses the perennial appeal of the Western, exploring its 19th century popular culture, and its relationship to the economic structure of Hollywood. This work considers the defining features of the Western and traces its main cycles, from the epic Westerns of the 1920s and singing cowboys of the 1930s to the Spaghetti Westerns of the 1960s."
  14. 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die's icon

    1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die

    Favs/dislikes: 1709:24. The 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die list is actually a film reference book compiled by various critics worldwide and edited by Steven Jay Schneider. The list spans movies from as early as 1902 up to recent releases. [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1001_Movies_You_Must_See_Before_You_Die]Source[/url]
  15. 101 War Movies You Must See Before You Die's icon

    101 War Movies You Must See Before You Die

    Favs/dislikes: 73:1. Steven Jay Schneider's 101 War Movies You Must See Before You Die The horror and the heroism of war has long been a staple of cinema and the background for many different story genres, from anti-war comedies such as M*A*S*H to the heroic feats of combat troops and fighter pilots played by the likes of John Wayne and other screen favorites. Here are the 101 most memorable war films ever produced. [url=https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7249742-101-war-movies-you-must-see-before-you-die]Source[/url]
  16. 1910s's icon

    1910s

    Favs/dislikes: 76:5. Movies really started making an impact in the 1910s, with audiences demanding more complicated plots and more information on the stars. This led to the rise of the great studios and the construction of many movie theaters. It was also a decade of innovation, with both the technology and the medium itself. D.W. Griffith's epic Birth of a Nation in particular helped film-making make a giant leap forward. The most popular genres were westerns, melodramas and slapstick comedies.
  17. 1920s's icon

    1920s

    Favs/dislikes: 114:4. The 1920s were an innovative decade in which both "talkies" and color films made their first appearance. Film became so popular that the first real stars arose in the persons of Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford. A lot of European stars were imported during the 20s, such as Fritz Lang and Greta Garbo. That was not all Europe had to offer as German Expressionism became an influential artistic movement. The most popular genres were swashbucklers, historical extravaganzas and melodramas. The greatest output of films was actually in the 1920s and 1930s, which was made possible by the studios' factory-like production system.
  18. 1930s's icon

    1930s

    Favs/dislikes: 118:5. The 1930s decade has been nostalgically labeled "The Golden Age of Hollywood" (although most of the output of the decade was black-and-white). The 30s was also the decade of the sound and color revolutions and the advance of the 'talkies', and the further development of film genres (gangster films, musicals, newspaper-reporting films, historical biopics, social-realism films, lighthearted screwball comedies, westerns and horror to name a few). It was the era in which the silent period ended, with many silent film stars not making the transition to sound. It was in the 30s that Disney produced the first feature-length animated film, an animation hallmark.
  19. 1940s's icon

    1940s

    Favs/dislikes: 131:4. The early years of the 40s decade were not promising for the American film industry, however, Hollywood film production rebounded and reached its profitable peak of efficiency during the years 1943 to 1946. Advances in film technology (sound recording, lighting, special effects, cinematography and use of color) meant that films were more watchable and 'modern'. The films themselves took on a more realistic rather than escapist tone, as they had done during the Depression years of the 30s. The 40s also were the decade that saw the birth of a new genre in film noir ("black film") pared with the revival of gangster films.
  20. 1950s's icon

    1950s

    Favs/dislikes: 116:4. In the period following WWII when most of the films were idealized with conventional portrayals of men and women, young people wanted new and exciting symbols of rebellion. Hollywood responded to audience demands through the rise of the anti-hero and anti-heroines, with Marlon Brando, James Dean and Marilyn Monroe being the main stars. Studios tried to counter the rise of television through all sorts of (mostly failed) inventions like 3-D, Smell-O-Vision, and cinerama. Risks were taken with lavish, overstated, spectacular epics and musicals.
  21. 1960s's icon

    1960s

    Favs/dislikes: 120:4. Cinema in the 1960s reflected the decade of fun, fashion, rock 'n' roll, tremendous social changes and transitional cultural values. It was not a good decade for US films, as production declined and foreign films gained tremenduous influence. British cinema in particular flourished as it released a number of films that used a new wave of grim, non-fictional, social realism, dubbed or styled "Kitchen Sink" due to its angry, every-day working-class heroes, frank dialogue, and negative post-war themes. However, countries like Japan, Italy and France also claimed their spots in the forefront of cinema.
  22. 1970s's icon

    1970s

    Favs/dislikes: 187:11. Although the 1970s opened with Hollywood experiencing a financial and artistic depression, the decade became a creative high point in the US film industry. Restrictions on language, adult content and sexuality, and violence had loosened up, and these elements became more widespread. The counter-culture of the time had influenced Hollywood to be freer, to take more risks and to experiment with alternative, young film makers (nicknamed "Movie Brats"), as old Hollywood professionals and old-style moguls died out and a new generation of film makers arose and caused Hollywood to be renewed and reborn.
  23. 1980s's icon

    1980s

    Favs/dislikes: 204:7. The decade of the 1980s tended to consolidate the gains made in the seventies rather than to initiate any new trends. Designed and packaged for mass audience appeal, few 80s films became what could be called 'classics'. The era was characterized by the introduction of 'high-concept' films - with cinematic plots that could be easily characterized by one or two sentences (25 words or less) - and therefore easily marketable and understandable. The 80s also were the decade in which the sequel-mania really took off, which often resulted in hastily-made, inferior knockoffs made by lesser film-makers.
  24. 1990s's icon

    1990s

    Favs/dislikes: 350:9. In the 90s, the belief was sustained that expensive, high-budget films with expensive special effects meant quality. However, the independently-distributed film movement was also proving that it could compete (both commercially and critically) with Hollywood's costly output. This decade also marked the advent of the home viewing of movies, in part made possible by the digital revolution that allowed movies to be greatly modified even after shooting.
  25. 2000s's icon

    2000s

    Favs/dislikes: 402:21. The 2000s continued with the trend of big blockbusters, which drew in massive amounts of money with the eager audience. The fantasy genre in particular flourished due to the success of The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The fallen status of Superhero movies was also revived, in large part due to successful installments in the Batman and Spider-man series. Furthermore, computer-generated animations films became a force to be reckoned with, as they garnered much praise even from the critics.
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