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  1. Top10ner’s 1001 'Greatest' Movies of All Time's icon

    Top10ner’s 1001 'Greatest' Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 213:1. Combined the average ratings (Critic's & Users) from IMDb, Rotten Tomatoes, Metacritic and Letterboxd, and then weighted and tweaked the results with general film data from iCheckMovies (incl. # of Official Top Lists) and IMDb to reveal the 1001 'Greatest' Movies of All Time.
  2. /r/Criterion's Greatest Films of All Time's icon

    /r/Criterion's Greatest Films of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 47:0. A polling of the Criterion Collection subreddit users on their top 10 films of all time. The users submitted their top 10 films of all time ranked, with the highest ranking film at #1 given 10 points and the lowest ranking at #10 given 1 point. The films were then ranked based on total number of points. Poll taken in January of 2016.
  3. 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die On Netflix Instant's icon

    1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die On Netflix Instant

    Favs/dislikes: 24:0. All movies from the '1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die' list that are available for streaming on Netflix Instant.
  4. Ebert's Original 100 Great Movies's icon

    Ebert's Original 100 Great Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 24:0. Below is a subset of Roger Ebert's list of great films containing only those in his book "The Great Movies", published in 2002. The Apu Trilogy, Decalogue, and Up Documentaries are all broken out separately, hence more than 100 listings. An excerpt from Ebert's introduction to the book: "They are not 'the' 100 greatest films of all time, because all lists of great movies are a foolish attempt to codify works which must stand alone. But it's fair to say: If you want to make a tour of the landmarks of the first century of cinema, start here."
  5. PopOqtiq's 200+ Greatest Horror Films's icon

    PopOqtiq's 200+ Greatest Horror Films

    Favs/dislikes: 23:0. PopOptiq's (formerly Sound on Sight) Ricky D counts down his favourite horror films.
  6. Filmspotting Top 100's icon

    Filmspotting Top 100

    Favs/dislikes: 21:0. The top 100 movies of all time as voted by the members of the Filmspotting forum.
  7. Ebert's Great Movies II's icon

    Ebert's Great Movies II

    Favs/dislikes: 17:0. Below is a subset of Roger Ebert's list of great films containing only those in his book "The Great Movies II", published in 2005. Originally I only listed three full-length feature films in lieu of Ebert's "Buster Keaton" chapter, but I have since brought this list in line with the official iCheck version of Ebert's Great Movies. Now Buster's body of work "from 1920 to 1929" is represented by selections 18-48 below. An excerpt from Ebert's introduction to the book: "One of my delights in these books ... has been to include movies not often cited as 'great' ... We go to different movies for different reasons, and greatness comes in many forms."
  8. The Pendragon: 1000 Greatest Films 2011's icon

    The Pendragon: 1000 Greatest Films 2011

    Favs/dislikes: 15:0. At the end of 2010 our site administrators and other contributors were each asked to name their 100 best films and the results were put into a list of the 1000 greatest. The results were first published on the 1st January 2011. Those voting for the list were aged between 19 and 76 years old which hopefully mean that there is not too much discrimination on the age of films. We are not, of course, going to arrogantly suggest this is the most definitive of all film lists. The purpose of the poll is to stimulate healthy debate and to get people thinking about what makes a great film.
  9. The Moving Arts 100 Greatest Movies of All Time's icon

    The Moving Arts 100 Greatest Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 12:0. A diverse list of the greatest movies ever made, compiled by the critics at the online magazine The Moving Arts Film Journal.
  10. Top10ner’s Fan Edition: 500 'Greatest' Movies of All Time's icon

    Top10ner’s Fan Edition: 500 'Greatest' Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 10:0. Combined the User ratings from IMDb, Rotten Tomatoes (Average Rating & Audience Score), and Metacritic (User) , and then weighted and tweaked the results with general film data from IMDb and iCheckMovies (incl. # of Official Top Lists ) to reveal the 500 Movies that the Fans love.
  11. 100 Years of Indian Cinema... 100 Greatest Films's icon

    100 Years of Indian Cinema... 100 Greatest Films

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. A list created during the turn of the 100-year anniversary of Indian cinema. It was a painstaking process, and a lot of research was done to give this list an objective feel. The list is based off AFI's list of 100 Greatest American Films and Johnathan Rosenbaum's Alternative 100. Films of all Indian languages are present, from Hindi to Marathi to Tamil to Telugu, to even Assamese. Three major criteria were considered for this list, in order of priority: 1. Cultural/artistic impact on India and the world - most important 2. Critical acclaim in India and abroad - 2nd most important 3. Popularity/cult status - 3rd (and least) important
  12. In the Mood for Film's icon

    In the Mood for Film

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. Personal list of movies balancing critical acclaim and entertainment. This list is in ongoing development and gets updated.
  13. Top10ner’s Critic Edition: 500 'Greatest' Movies of All Time's icon

    Top10ner’s Critic Edition: 500 'Greatest' Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 8:0. Combined the Critic ratings from Rotten Tomatoes (Average Rating & Tomatometer), Metacritic and Letterboxd, and then weighted and tweaked the results with general film data from IMDb and iCheckMovies (incl. Official Top Lists) to reveal the 500 Movies that the Critics love.
  14. NDTV's 62 Greatest Bollywood Movies's icon

    NDTV's 62 Greatest Bollywood Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 7:0. It's been 62 years since India became a Republic. In these six decades Bollywood has produced some remarkable films that have made us laugh, shed tears and rub our eyes in disbelief. Here's a look at 62 of the amazing films that are Bollywood's gift to the nation. Compiled by the New Delhi Television Limited broadcasting network.
  15. Empire's The Greatest Superhero Movies Of All Time's icon

    Empire's The Greatest Superhero Movies Of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 6:1. Empire readers pick their 30 top super flicks.
  16. Top10ner’s 150 'Greatest' Animation Movies of All Time's icon

    Top10ner’s 150 'Greatest' Animation Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. Combined the average ratings (Critic's & Users) from IMDb, Rotten Tomatoes, Metacritic and Letterboxd, and then weighted and tweaked the results with general film data from iCheckMovies (incl. # of Official Top Lists) and IMDb to reveal the 150 'Greatest' Animated Movies of All Time.
  17. Paste's 100 Best Horror Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Horror Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. This list has been a long time coming for Paste. We are fortunate—some would say “cool enough”—to have quite a lot of genre expertise to call upon when it comes to horror in particular. Several Paste staff writers and editors are lifelong horror geeks, and there’s also a strong sentiment toward the macabre among several of our more prolific contributing writers. Case in point: We have so many writers focused on horror that we’ve produced huge lists of the 70 best horror films on Netflix, or the 100 best horror films on Shudder, both within the last year. We’ve kept you up to date with the 10 best horror movies of 2017 so far. We’ve even given you the likes of the 50 best zombie movies of all time, and the 100 best vampire movies of all time, if you can believe that. And yet, somehow, despite all that expertise, we’ve never put together a definitive ranking of the best horror films of all time. That ends now, with the list below: a practical, must-see guide through the history of the horror genre. There are classic films on this list, of course. There are also likely a handful of independent features that will be unknown to all but the most dedicated horror hounds. There are foreign films from around the globe, entries that range from 1922 to 2017. In some cases, you will likely be shocked by films that are missing. In others, you’ll find yourself surprised to see us going to bat for films that don’t deserve the derision they’ve received. One thing is for certain: With all the films that were nominated, we could easily have made this list 200 entries long. Horror cinema speaks toward the dark side in all of us, allowing us to confront the most frightening, primal forces we struggle with every day—death, and human malevolence—in a way that is actually constructive in strengthening the psyche. In the oddest of ways, horror movies help us overcome our own fears.
  18. Band Apart's Greatest Films's icon

    Band Apart's Greatest Films

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0. International cinephile community A Band Apart in august of 2011 has organized voting in order to make the list of the greatest films in history of a cinema (Greatest Films Poll 2011). The sample took place with the participation of 125 film critics, bloggers, journalists and several directors from 18 countries of the world (Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Armenia, Estonia, USA, Canada, Indonesia, Philippines, India, Brazil, UK, Greece, Sweden, Italy, Spain, Netherlands and France). The wide geography of composers has provided a variety of tastes and opinions. In the final list there are presented 130 films from 17 countries and four parts of the world. In the top-list there are mentioned all decades, since 1920's. Also there is maintained balance between English-speaking and non-English-speaking films. All individual lists of participants can be looked here. The first place in the top-list has taken by Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, which outstripped in the general offset Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction and Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. Top-5 has completed with Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker and Ingmar Bergman’s Persona. The best film of 21 century by quantity of mentions has turned out to be David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr. (6th place). The oldest film of the list has appeared to be a silent movie The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), and the newest – 2011 Palme d'Or winner Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life. The list included 7 films of Stanley Kubrick, 5 films of Ingmar Bergman and Andrei Tarkovsky, 4 films of David Lynch, Krzysztof Kieslowski and Terrence Malick at once. On the basis of mentions, in lists has also been made top-50 of best directors. In total, by composers in their lists have been mentioned 3469 films and over 1500 directors. The final list included at once 9 pictures of the Soviet production. Except Andrei Tarkovsky’s 4 pictures, there are Sergei Eisenstein, Elem Klimov, Larisa Shepitko, Dziga Vertov, and Mikhail Kalatozov movies at the list. Also have been mentioned films of Parajanov, Muratova, Sokurov, Aleksei German, Kozincev, Dovzhenko, Balabanov, Shaunas Bartas and other directors of the Soviet and post-Soviet cinema. P.S. The community A Band Apart has been created in 2009 in order to popularize little-known pictures, to exchange impressions of cinema and to make top-lists of the best films. Sample of 2011 has already become the third annual. By results of the first sample in 2009, has been made the list of 59 films (the winner was Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction). By results of the second sample in 2010, has been made the list of 120 films (the winner was Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver). http://rottenaparts.ru/poll-2012
  19. Film4's Top 50 Horror Films's icon

    Film4's Top 50 Horror Films

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0.
  20. Horror-Movies.ca's 15 Best New Horror Movies (poll)'s icon

    Horror-Movies.ca's 15 Best New Horror Movies (poll)

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0.
  21. Mehta's Greatest Indian Movies's icon

    Mehta's Greatest Indian Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 4:1. That aren't a musical or over 3 hours in length.
  22. Onderhond's Top 100 Animated Films's icon

    Onderhond's Top 100 Animated Films

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0. Onderhond's Top 100 Animated Films, as published on the forum of the Dutch website MovieMeter.nl disclaimer: as of March 20th 2017, five movies will be added to the list each day, until 100 is reached.
  23. Paste's 100 Best Western Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Western Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0. List published in June 2016 Is the Western the most American of movie genres? You can make an argument for the Western film’s internationality on the names of the directors who have contributed to its iconography: You have your John Fords and your Anthony Manns, your Sam Peckinpahs and your Samuel Fullers, but over in Europe you also have filmmakers like Sergio Leone, Enzo G. Castellari and Sergio Corbucci, among many, many others, as authors of Western offshoots that influence filmmakers even today. (And of course there are those great entries in the Western canon that were lifted wholesale from Akira Kurosawa’s filmography.) Hell, let’s flash from the Western’s glory days to the last decade, where Kim Jee-woon and Takashi Miike have put their individual stamps on its tropes and motifs. For these reasons, there’s certainly an argument to made that the Western is truly “universal.” But no matter where Western movies are made, no matter what subgenre classifications they are individually accorded, and no matter who makes them, the films always engage with symbols, eras and images that are quintessentially “American.” The Western is the domain of the cowboy, the solitary hero. It’s a place where law and chaos are ever in conflict with one another and where the difference between survival and death usually comes down to who is faster on the draw. It’s a testament to the rich, awesome power of the Western as a narrative mode that filmmakers from around the planet have found stories worth telling within its purview, but even the Italian maestros simply added their own unique (and significant) flourishes to a cinematic tradition that is American in its DNA. Maybe it’s more accurate to say that they made the Western their own. Spaghetti Westerns are, after all, a cousin to American Westerns in terms of style, content, themes and morality. The Italian Westerns are literally gritty where American Westerns are polished and clean; they deal in ambiguity instead of black and white. The average Spaghetti Western hero looks like a total bastard next to the clean-cut heroes of American Westerns, who uphold all of the best and most commonly accepted standards of heroism as we know them. Who would you rather save the day for you? Will Kane, or the man with no name? There’s a divide separating the Westerns made by Europeans and those shot by Americans, but if you can sort these movies out by their varying approaches, you can’t keep them all from standing under one umbrella. (A better point of debate: Did the Spaghetti Western become a thing in 1958 or 1964?) Like the wide and sprawling landscapes that are so much a part of the Western’s character as a genre, the Western itself is a big, open canvas for storytelling of all stripes. With that in mind, we here at Paste set about collecting Westerns from all over the map and across the ages to assemble our picks for the 100 best Western films of all time. —Andy Crump
  24. Reader's Digest: The 31 Scariest Movies of All Time's icon

    Reader's Digest: The 31 Scariest Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0.
  25. Scott Weinberg's The Top 50 Horror Films, 2000 to 2009's icon

    Scott Weinberg's The Top 50 Horror Films, 2000 to 2009

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0.
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