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  1. A Year With Women: 103 Essential Films By Female Filmmakers's icon

    A Year With Women: 103 Essential Films By Female Filmmakers

    Favs/dislikes: 29:0. From Cinemafanatic.com: Lately I’ve become more and more frustrated with the various “best ever” lists that have been released because they rarely feature films by women, or if they do it’s usually one or two films. I think this is more a reflection of those who are polled for these kinds of lists, as well as a compounding of history on itself. For so long films by men have made up the bulk of the film canon and I think people are afraid to add new films to these revered lists. I also think many people haven’t seen very many films by women, or if they have it’s always the same handful of films. In an attempt to create a better, more inclusive list of great films by women, I polled over 500 critics, filmmakers, bloggers, historians, professors and casual film viewers, asking them to tell me what films directed (or co-directed) by women are essential viewing. Some people only responded with as little as five votes, others submitted hundreds of films. In the end, I received over 7,000 votes for 1,100+ different films. After tallying up this data, with ties factored in, I then had a list of 103 essential films directed by women. While this list is in no way the end all and be all of female filmmakers, it does include films from multiple countries, filmmakers of all ages, films from all kinds of genres and spans 9 decades. Also, I would like to point out that although the earliest film on this list is from 1935, there were several filmmakers from the silent era who were women (and whose films were in the initial 1,100+ list), including Alice Guy-Blaché, Lois Weber and others. This list should be looked at as a springboard, a way to get your feet wet with the most beloved films made by women. There are lots of resources to find even more great films by women. DirectedByWomen.com and TheDirectorList.com are two such invaluable places to start learning more about the thousands of women who have been making films since the beginning of cinema.
  2. Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film's icon

    Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film

    Favs/dislikes: 23:0. In October 2013, the British Film Institute unveiled an exhibition chronicling the history of dark and macabre films. In an ambitious project, the BFI unveiled a collection of a large number of films spanning four categories, bringing these films to British cinemas over a four month period. Films are arranged chronologically by theme. The Four Parts: - Monstrous (1-26) - The Dark Arts (27-48) - Haunted (49-71) - Love is a Devil (72-99) Although this exhibition includes a large number of plays, professional talks, documentaries, television series' and shorts, this list contains only the feature films presented in the exhibition.
  3. Netflix Original Films's icon

    Netflix Original Films

    Favs/dislikes: 21:0. A list of all original feature films produced and/or distributed by Netflix.
  4. A Film Buff's Guide to Movie Movements's icon

    A Film Buff's Guide to Movie Movements

    Favs/dislikes: 19:1. Films held up as examples of prominent film movements by Empire magazine in their "Film 101" section. The films are divided into their respective movements: French Impressionaism German Expressionism Soviet Montage Documentary Film Movement Poetic Realism Italian Neorealism Polish Film School Free Cinema Direct Cinema British New Wave French New Wave Japanese New Wave Cinema Novo Czech New Wave New German Cinema LA Rebellion The Movie Brats Australian New Wave Cinema du Look New Queer Cinema Dogme 95 Mumblecore
  5. Time Out's 50 Best Films Set in Paris's icon

    Time Out's 50 Best Films Set in Paris

    Favs/dislikes: 16:0. Romance blooms on a belle époque street corner. A dark-eyed girl in Montmartre runs her hand through a bag of dried beans. In the suburbs, Arabs square up to skinheads. Nicotine-stained tales of sexual misadventure unfold in beds all over the city, while gangsters commit crimes and cartoon rats cook up a storm. Paris, which boasts a higher concentration of picture houses than any other city, has been the inspiration and the backdrop for countless films. Below, we present 50 of the best, organised by era. Be they Nouvelle Vague masterpieces or populist comedies, the capital is always in the starring role... -Time Out Paris This list is organized chronologically.
  6. iCM Forum's Favourite Balkan Films's icon

    iCM Forum's Favourite Balkan Films

    Favs/dislikes: 15:0. The list created from a poll of members of the unofficial icheckmovies forum. This list contains all the films that received over 100 points (equal to one first place vote) and received 2 or more votes. If you would like to contribute to a future version of this list, please send me an icheckmovies or IMDb list with your choices. For a full list of the films nominated, please see : http://www.imdb.com/list/ls036420290/
  7. Rateyourmusic.com 200 Surrealist Films's icon

    Rateyourmusic.com 200 Surrealist Films

    Favs/dislikes: 15:0. Top 200 surrealist films of all time according to members of Rateyourmusic.com 163. The Midnight Parasites (Yoji Kuri, 1972) is missing from imdb.
  8. The (semi) Official Letterboxd Top 250's icon

    The (semi) Official Letterboxd Top 250

    Favs/dislikes: 15:0. The top 250 films as voted by users of Letterboxd.com.
  9. San Sebastián Film Festival: "Golden Shell"'s icon

    San Sebastián Film Festival: "Golden Shell"

    Favs/dislikes: 14:0. The highest prize awarded at the San Sebastián Film Festival.
  10. Golden Globe Best Foreign Language Film Winners's icon

    Golden Globe Best Foreign Language Film Winners

    Favs/dislikes: 12:0. All of the winners for the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Presented annually since 1965. Between 1973 and 1985, non-American films in the English language were also eligible.
  11. New York Movies:  The 100 Best Films Set in New York's icon

    New York Movies: The 100 Best Films Set in New York

    Favs/dislikes: 11:0. Paradise and prison, bustling metropolis and the loneliest place on earth: New York City has a cinematic identity that infuses all walks of life. Even as we write our own narratives in this most famous of locations, we walk alongside fictional characters (and sometimes real ones, too, if we’re lucky). In selecting the 100 most essential New York movies, we kept the city’s boldness in mind. TONY Film staffers David Fear, Joshua Rothkopf and Keith Uhlich teamed up with movie experts Stephen Garrett and Alison Willmore to gather titles from all genres and eras—the widely known and the obscure—in pursuit of a complete picture of NYC on film. Our only parameter: The movie had to be set in New York City, not Metropolis (sorry, Superman fans), Oz (ditto, you Wiz diehards), nor anywhere else. Dive in, jostle politely, find your seat or ride standing: Please tell us what we’ve missed. It’s a big town. —Joshua Rothkopf, senior Film writer at Time Out New York List published on July 3rd 2012
  12. The Hollywood Romantic Comedy's icon

    The Hollywood Romantic Comedy

    Favs/dislikes: 11:0. From the book by Leger Grindon (2011). The filmography is arranged by a chronological progression of themes: Transition to Sound (1930-1933) Screwball (1934-1942) World war II and the Homefront (1942-1946) Post-War: Melancholy and Reconciliation (1947-1953) The Comedies of Seduction: The Playboy, the Gold Digger, and the Virgin (1953-1966) The transition through the counter-culture (1967-1976) Nervous Romance (1977-1987) Reaffirmation of Romance (1986-1996) Grotesque and Ambivalent (1997-present)
  13. The 77 Best Kids Films of All Time's icon

    The 77 Best Kids Films of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 10:0. As posted by the Telegraph. The list was presented chronologically with multiple entries for the Star Wars, Toy Story, Harry Potter, and Despicable Me franchises.
  14. BFI Film Classics's icon

    BFI Film Classics

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. The BFI Film Classics series is a collection of short books analysing major works of world cinema. Volumes in this series have been assembled by some of the world's leading film critics. The first volumes in the series were published in 1992 and new entries continue to be added every year.
  15. Empire's 50 Funniest Comedies Ever's icon

    Empire's 50 Funniest Comedies Ever

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. Voted on by Empire magazine readers.
  16. The A.V. Club Yearly Best Film Lists's icon

    The A.V. Club Yearly Best Film Lists

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. Beginning in 2006, the AV Club has published an annual list of the year's best films. Sorted by year, in descending order for each year.
  17. Top 50 Films of Queer Cinema's icon

    Top 50 Films of Queer Cinema

    Favs/dislikes: 8:0. The top 50 queer cinema films as voted on by users of Rateyourmusic.com's film page.
  18. Canadian Screen Awards/Genie Awards: Best Motion Picture's icon

    Canadian Screen Awards/Genie Awards: Best Motion Picture

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. A list of winners of the Canadian Screen Award (formerly Genie award) for Best Canadian Motion picture. The Canadian Film Awards were first held in 1949 with the award for Best Feature Film first being presented in 1964. This award was presented annually (except for 1974) until 1979, before becoming the Genie Awards in 1980. For the 2013 award season, the Genie awards and the Gemini awards (for excellence in Canadian television) were merged to form the Canadian Screen Awards. Voted on by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television.
  19. Paste's 100 Best Horror Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Horror Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. This list has been a long time coming for Paste. We are fortunate—some would say “cool enough”—to have quite a lot of genre expertise to call upon when it comes to horror in particular. Several Paste staff writers and editors are lifelong horror geeks, and there’s also a strong sentiment toward the macabre among several of our more prolific contributing writers. Case in point: We have so many writers focused on horror that we’ve produced huge lists of the 70 best horror films on Netflix, or the 100 best horror films on Shudder, both within the last year. We’ve kept you up to date with the 10 best horror movies of 2017 so far. We’ve even given you the likes of the 50 best zombie movies of all time, and the 100 best vampire movies of all time, if you can believe that. And yet, somehow, despite all that expertise, we’ve never put together a definitive ranking of the best horror films of all time. That ends now, with the list below: a practical, must-see guide through the history of the horror genre. There are classic films on this list, of course. There are also likely a handful of independent features that will be unknown to all but the most dedicated horror hounds. There are foreign films from around the globe, entries that range from 1922 to 2017. In some cases, you will likely be shocked by films that are missing. In others, you’ll find yourself surprised to see us going to bat for films that don’t deserve the derision they’ve received. One thing is for certain: With all the films that were nominated, we could easily have made this list 200 entries long. Horror cinema speaks toward the dark side in all of us, allowing us to confront the most frightening, primal forces we struggle with every day—death, and human malevolence—in a way that is actually constructive in strengthening the psyche. In the oddest of ways, horror movies help us overcome our own fears. Last updated June 2018
  20. Paste's 100 Best Superhero Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Superhero Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 6:2. Published in January 2017 (updated November 2017) Two things quickly become evident when putting together a list of the 100 Best Superhero Movies of All Time. First, this is the Golden Age for such films, a decade where technology, long-unrequited fandom and surging popular awareness have all combined to thrill moviegoers and make Hollywood billions of dollars. Second, it’s still fair to say that most superhero films are not that good. There’s no real contradiction at play here. The niche just lacks the pedigree of its fellow movie genres. Though superhero comic books may have started to make a dint in popular culture 75 years ago (give or take), technology only crossed over from hindrance to enabling force in the last 20 years or so. As a result, while curating a 100 Best Westerns of All Time or 100 Best Documentaries of All Time list requires the exclusion of arguably good films to select the best 100—for superhero movies? The pickings get slim after 40. In fact, the real challenge for this list was choosing amongst the dreck (some of it beloved dreck!) that would fill out the bottom half. It turns out it’s much easier to argue for or against a top 10 film’s exact placement (and frankly, compelling arguments could be made for almost any of our top 5 as deserving the #1 position), than weighing the relative “merits” of Masters of the Universe, Swamp Thing and Elektra. This also means the bottom half of this list will change swiftly compared to, say, The Best B-Movies of All Time. In fact, it’s a safe assumption if there are 15 superhero movies in the next three years, at least 14 of them will knock numbers 86-99 off this list. (Our #100 is a bit of a wild card.) Finally, some criteria. To be considered for this list, a film must possess at least two of the following three qualities: 1) It must involve costumed shenanigans, 2) It must involve a superpowered protagonist and/or 3) the protagonist must exist in a world where the supernatural/extraordinary is demonstrably present. These criteria are why meta-commentary films like Kick-Ass and Super are not on this list. And it’s also why some films with pulpy characters like Zorro, Tarzan and Conan are not, while others like The Phantom are. (Zane’s costume combined with the Skulls of Touganda do the trick.) Admittedly, the lines gets blurry. Also absent from this list is any consideration of foreign superhero films. That’s not because some are not worthy—especially given the movie quality issue mentioned at the top—it’s just an area we’d rather get better versed in before pouring into this list. Next year, perhaps. The three Matrix films were counted as a single entry in the source list.
  21. Paste's the 100 Best Sci-fi Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's the 100 Best Sci-fi Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. Much like its close genre cousin (nephew/niece?) the superhero film, the potential of cinematic science fiction exploded in the latter part of the 20th century thanks to technological advances that transformed special effects. Unlike superhero films, which were so stunted for so long that almost every new one makes it onto our updated 100 Best Superhero Films of All Time list, science fiction proved fertile ground for filmmakers before the likes of Industrial Light & Magic supercharged a director’s ability to exceed our imagination. Thus, this list, while filled with films from the ’80s onward, has its fair share of older films. Before we dive into it, though, let’s discuss a few things this list will not have (or at least, not have many of). Superhero films are for the most part absent. Though so many superhero stories involve the stuff of science fiction—aliens, high-tech and strange worlds—there are plenty of great sci-fi movies to include on this list without bumping 20 of them off for DC and the MCU. (We’ve made an exception for one entry because the space opera underpinnings were too strong to ignore.) We’ve also left off, for the most part, the traditional giant monster/kaiju movie for the same reason. If you want a nice roundup of Godzilla’s greatest hits, check out our own Jim Vorel’s ranking of Godzilla’s cinematic oeuvre. (For the real kaiju rank-o-phile, Jim has also taken the measure of every Godzilla monster.) Finally, joining superheroes and kaiju on the sidelines, are the post-apocalyptic (and a few mid-apocalyptic) films. Though, again, there are a few exceptions, for the most part you will not find Mad Max here, or Eli, or even that guy who is Legend. (I see you frowning—“But will there be dystopias,” you ask? Hell yeah, we got dystopias.)
  22. Stockholm International Film Festival: Bronze Horse's icon

    Stockholm International Film Festival: Bronze Horse

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. An award given for best film at the Stockholm International Film Festival. Awarded since 1990.
  23. Istanbulfilm's Balkan cinema lists's icon

    Istanbulfilm's Balkan cinema lists

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. A list of films compiled from various Balkan countries. Most countries are represented with various standouts from their respective national cinemas. Albania (1-8), Bosnia and Herzegovina (9-17), Bulgaria (18-48), Croatia (49-62), Greece (63-91), Macedonia (92-102), Romania (103-134), Serbia (135-171), Slovenia (172-183)
  24. Paste's 100 Best Western Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Western Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. List published in June 2016 Is the Western the most American of movie genres? You can make an argument for the Western film’s internationality on the names of the directors who have contributed to its iconography: You have your John Fords and your Anthony Manns, your Sam Peckinpahs and your Samuel Fullers, but over in Europe you also have filmmakers like Sergio Leone, Enzo G. Castellari and Sergio Corbucci, among many, many others, as authors of Western offshoots that influence filmmakers even today. (And of course there are those great entries in the Western canon that were lifted wholesale from Akira Kurosawa’s filmography.) Hell, let’s flash from the Western’s glory days to the last decade, where Kim Jee-woon and Takashi Miike have put their individual stamps on its tropes and motifs. For these reasons, there’s certainly an argument to made that the Western is truly “universal.” But no matter where Western movies are made, no matter what subgenre classifications they are individually accorded, and no matter who makes them, the films always engage with symbols, eras and images that are quintessentially “American.” The Western is the domain of the cowboy, the solitary hero. It’s a place where law and chaos are ever in conflict with one another and where the difference between survival and death usually comes down to who is faster on the draw. It’s a testament to the rich, awesome power of the Western as a narrative mode that filmmakers from around the planet have found stories worth telling within its purview, but even the Italian maestros simply added their own unique (and significant) flourishes to a cinematic tradition that is American in its DNA. Maybe it’s more accurate to say that they made the Western their own. Spaghetti Westerns are, after all, a cousin to American Westerns in terms of style, content, themes and morality. The Italian Westerns are literally gritty where American Westerns are polished and clean; they deal in ambiguity instead of black and white. The average Spaghetti Western hero looks like a total bastard next to the clean-cut heroes of American Westerns, who uphold all of the best and most commonly accepted standards of heroism as we know them. Who would you rather save the day for you? Will Kane, or the man with no name? There’s a divide separating the Westerns made by Europeans and those shot by Americans, but if you can sort these movies out by their varying approaches, you can’t keep them all from standing under one umbrella. (A better point of debate: Did the Spaghetti Western become a thing in 1958 or 1964?) Like the wide and sprawling landscapes that are so much a part of the Western’s character as a genre, the Western itself is a big, open canvas for storytelling of all stripes. With that in mind, we here at Paste set about collecting Westerns from all over the map and across the ages to assemble our picks for the 100 best Western films of all time. —Andy Crump
  25. Sutherland Trophy's icon

    Sutherland Trophy

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. Created in 1958, the Sutherland Trophy was awarded annually by the British Film Institute to "the maker of the most original and imaginative [first or second feature] film introduced at the National Film Theatre during the year". In 1997, the criteria changed to honour the maker of the most original and imaginative first feature screened during the London Film Festival.
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