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  1. Lupin the Third (Rupan sansei)'s icon

    Lupin the Third (Rupan sansei)

    Favs/dislikes: 0:0. Lupin III (Rupan Sansei), also written as Lupin the Third or Lupin the 3rd, is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Monkey Punch. It follows the escapades of master thief Arsène Lupin III, the grandson of Arsène Lupin, the gentleman thief of Maurice Leblanc's series of novels. The Lupin III manga, which first appeared in Weekly Manga Action on August 10, 1967, spawned a media franchise that includes numerous manga, four anime television series, five animated feature films, two live-action films, three OVAs, yearly television specials since 1989, music CDs, video games, and a musical. Many different companies have owned the English-language distribution rights to various Lupin III properties at various times, with just the first two movies having been released by over 10 companies alone. Tokyopop acquired the license to the original manga in 2002, and later the second series in 2004. Funimation Entertainment purchased the rights to several of the television specials and films in 2002, and the fourth television series in 2012. Geneon licensed and dubbed 79 episodes of the second television series, 26 of which were broadcast on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim during 2003. Discotek Media licensed the entire first television series and the live-action film, they also own the rights to several other Lupin titles, including some previously released by other companies. Over forty years after its creation, Lupin III remains popular, with several different manga series currently being published, yearly television specials and a fourth anime series which aired in 2012. For several years, issues relating to the copyright of Maurice Leblanc's intellectual property meant that the Lupin name was removed from its releases outside of Japan, usually changed to "Rupan" or "Wolf". However, the copyright has since expired, allowing foreign releases to use the Lupin name.
  2. iCM Forum's 500_400 (2015)'s icon

    iCM Forum's 500_400 (2015)

    Favs/dislikes: 1:0.
  3. The Spaghetti Western Database's icon

    The Spaghetti Western Database

    Favs/dislikes: 1:0. The complete list (last update January 2015): http://forum.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/topic,190.msg172383.html#msg172383
  4. KORT!'s icon

    KORT!

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. KORT! ("short" in Dutch) gives a mix of both beginners/young and more experienced/established screenwriters/filmmakers the chance to make short (stand-alone) fiction films. The films will be screened at the Dutch Film Festival, then online and a year later on television during the so-called evening of the short film. The NTR (a Dutch public broadcaster), the Dutch Film Fund, the Dutch Cultural Broadcasting Fund and the Co-production Fund Domestic Broadcasting facilitate the production of these short fiction films. Shorts remarkably not included in the IMDb: Rat (Roel Boorsma & Berend Boorsma) Salt-battle (Ron Termaat) 11:59 (Johan Kramer) Dialoogoefening (Esther Rots) De laatste dag (Saskia Diesing) Ruwe honing (Annick Vroom) Salto Mortale (Vincent Schuurman)
  5. Messianic Archetypes in Movies's icon

    Messianic Archetypes in Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. The Messianic Archetype is a character whose role in the story echoes that of Christ. They are portrayed as a savior, whether the thing they are saving is a person, a lot of people or the whole of humanity. They endure a sizable sacrifice as the means of bringing that salvation about for others, a fate they do not deserve up to and including death or a Fate Worse than Death. Other elements may be mixed and matched as required but the Messianic Archetype will include one or more of the following: being the Chosen One, gaining a group of devoted followers, being betrayed by one of these followers, persecution by nonbelievers, parallels to the Passion Play, obvious Crucified Hero Shot, a figurative or literal resurrection, and even a Second Coming. Bonus points if the character has the initials JC. [url]http://tvtropes.org[/url] Checklist: 01. Odd, unexpected and obscure birth or otherwise strange origin and arrival 02. Central protagonist and/or object of concern within the narrative 03. Outsider 04. Sent by deliberate outside intervention 05. Alter ego or dual identity (one mundane and the other fantastic) 06. Very special, rare and unusual being although appears as normal human doing mundane activities throughout normal working live 07. Apostle-figures (intimate friends-cum-associate) 08. Begin “divine” mission at the age of thirty 09.Judas-figure (inner circle intimates who betrays friend for essentially unwholesome reasons). 10. Mary Magdalene-figure (sexually tagged women who are related to the Christ-figure in some close way, but do not know exactly how to express her sexuality with him) 11. John the Baptist-figure (prophetically point the way to the Christ-figure) 12. Dies (cruelly) and then miraculously comes back to life again as good-as-new, if not better 13. Death results in victory 14. Sacrifice made by Christ-figure specifically benefit others and are based upon higher principles, although these others are usually of lesser worthiness, talent or power, comparatively speaking 15. Choose sacrifice out of newfound knowledge, status, position or cosmic mission requirements 16. Accused of crimes although totally innocent 17. Cruciform posture 18. Acompanied by cross imagery 19. Incredible behaviour (walking on water) 20. Appears as simple, fool or crazy 21. Pronounced poverty 22. White clothing (toga, cloth) 23. Blue eyes 24. Verbal tags (“My God!” or “Jesus Christ!” or “Jesus!” or “Christ!”) 25. Initials J.C. (Kozlovic)
  6. Modern era adaptations of Shakespare's icon

    Modern era adaptations of Shakespare

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. Plays written by William Shakespare set in the 20th century or later. The Tempest, Measure for Measure, A Comedy of Errors, Much Ado About Nothing, Love's Labour's Lost, A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, The Taming of the Shrew, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Richard III, Coriolanus, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet, Othello and Antony and Cleopatra.
  7. Telefilm's icon

    Telefilm

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. Telefilms are Dutch films made ​​specifically for Public Broadcasting. The films deal with current social issues. The aim of the project is to stimulate cooperation between the film industry and broadcasters and to promote homegrown drama productions among the Dutch public. There are six films produced annually (none in 2000 and nine in 2001). Several films won national and international film awards. The Telefilms are established with financial support from the Ministry of Education and the Co-production Fund Domestic Broadcasting.
  8. Movie Titles From the Bible's icon

    Movie Titles From the Bible

    Favs/dislikes: 3:0. Movies with titles that appear word for word in the bible arranged in order of appearance.
  9. Sources of the Star Wars-trilogy's icon

    Sources of the Star Wars-trilogy

    Favs/dislikes: 3:0. George Lucas was inspired by a lot whilst writing the story of Star Wars. He was influenced by books, mythology, religion, his personal life and of course movies. This list gives an overview of films and television series that have left their prints in this story.
  10. Constitutional Law in Movies's icon

    Constitutional Law in Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. Films about the following themes: 1. State and legal structure 2. Human rights 3. Legislative procedure 4. Rule of law 5. Separation of powers
  11. "Single Set Production" Movies's icon

    "Single Set Production" Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. Movies that are predominantly or entirely set in a single location (e.g. one room). List may be expanded.
  12. The Perfect Crime/Murder's icon

    The Perfect Crime/Murder

    Favs/dislikes: 7:0. Perfect crime is a colloquial term used in law and fiction (principally crime fiction) to characterize crimes that are undetected, unattributed to a perpetrator, or else unsolved as a kind of technical achievement on the part of the perpetrator. In certain contexts, the concept of perfect crime is limited to just undetected crimes; if an event is ever identified as a crime, some investigators say it cannot be called 'perfect'. A perfect crime should be distinguished from one that has merely not been solved yet or where everyday chance or procedural matters frustrate a conviction. There is an element that the crime is (or appears likely to be) unable to be solved.
  13. Social psychology's icon

    Social psychology

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. Milgram experiment Stanford prison experiment The Asch Conformity Experiment The Good Samaritan Experiment Bystander Apathy Experiment /-effect / Kitty Genovese Third Wave Bobo Doll Experiment Sherif’s Robbers Cave Experiment
  14. A List Full of Spaghetti Westerns's icon

    A List Full of Spaghetti Westerns

    Favs/dislikes: 12:0. Spaghetti Western is a broad sub-genre of Western films that emerged in the mid-1960s in the wake of Sergio Leone's film-making style and international box-office success. The term was used by critics in USA and other countries because most of these Westerns were produced and directed by Italians. It was Sergio Leone who defined the look and attitude of the genre with his first western and the two that soon were to follow:For a Few Dollars more (1965) and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966). Together these films are called ‘The Dollars Trilogy’. Leone’s West was a dusty wasteland of whitewashed villages, howling winds, scraggy dogs and cynical heroes, as unshaven as the villains. All three films were scored by Ennio Morricone, and his music was as unusual as Leone’s visuals: not only did he use instruments like the trumpet, the harp or the electric guitar, he also added whistle, cracking whips and gunshots to the concoction, described by a critic as a ‘rattlesnake in a drumkit’. Morricone went on to score over 30 Italian westerns and was a key factor in the genre's success. In general spaghetti westerns are more action oriented than their American counterparts. Dialogue is sparse and some critics have pointed out that they are constructed as operas, using the music as an illustrative ingredient of the narrative. For the time of making many spaghetti westerns were quite violent, and several of them met with censorship problems, causing them to be cut or even banned in certain markets. Many spaghetti westerns have an American-Mexican border setting and feature loud and sadistic Mexican bandits. The Civil War and its aftermath is a recurrent background. Instead of regular names the heroes often have bizarre names like Ringo, Sartana, Sabata, Johnny Oro, Arizona Colt or Django. The genre is unmistakably a catholic genre (some other names in use are Hallelujah, Cemetery, Trinity or Holy Water Joe!), with a visual style strongly influenced by the catholic iconography of, for instance, the crucifixion, the last supper or the ecce homo. The surreal extravanganza Django Kill! (Se sei vivo, spara, 1967), by Giulio Questi, former assistant of Fellini (!) has a resurrected hero who witnesses a reflection of Judgment Day in a dusty western town. [url]http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Introduction[/url] [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaghetti_Western[/url]
  15. USA Up All Night's icon

    USA Up All Night

    Favs/dislikes: 12:0. USA Up All Night (also known as Up All Night and Up All Night with Rhonda Shear) is an American cable television series that aired weekly on Friday and Saturday nights on the USA Network. The show aired from 1989 to 1998. The program consisted of low-budget films, bookended by in-studio or on-location comedy skits featuring the show's hosts. In addition to skits, the hosts would also provide sardonic comments about the featured film(s), and observations on various Hollywood- and/or New York City-area clubs and attractions (when the series was shooting out of studio). Including commercials, the program typically ran from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. [wikipedia]
  16. Minimal cast movies's icon

    Minimal cast movies

    Favs/dislikes: 14:0. Movies with a remarkably small cast.
  17. Condemned by the Legion of Decency's icon

    Condemned by the Legion of Decency

    Favs/dislikes: 17:0. This is a list of films condemned by the Legion of Decency, a United States Catholic organization, and its successor (from 1965), the National Catholic Office for Motion Pictures. The condemned (or C) rating was issued from the time of the Legion's formation in 1933 until 1978, when the C rating and the B rating were merged into the new O ("morally offensive") rating. In 1980, the NCOMP film office was shut down, along with the biweekly Review, which had published ratings on 16,251 feature films. The Legion's ratings were applied to movies made in the United States (which were subject to the Production Code until 1967) as well as those imported from other countries. Beginning in 1968, the ratings were applied in addition to any rating assigned by the MPAA film rating system. Legion-organized boycotts made a C rating harmful to a film's distribution and profitability. Accordingly, for the majority of years that the rating was applied, most condemned films were made outside of the United States, where their producers didn't have as much to fear from the condemnation. Of the 53 movies the Legion had placed on its condemned list by 1943, only Howard Hughes' The Outlaw came from a major US studio, and it had not been approved by the Production Code or distributed widely. Despite rumors to the contrary, Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire and Billy Wilder's The Seven Year Itch did not receive C ratings. Rather, Kazan's film was cut by 4 minutes to avoid condemnation, while Wilder's film had to cut scenes from the original play to be approved by Legion of Decency. [wikipedia]
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