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  1. Five or More Oscars's icon

    Five or More Oscars

    Favs/dislikes: 53:0. Below are all films that have won 5 or more competitive Academy Awards, sorted first by number of awards, then by year of release.
  2. Ebert's Original 100 Great Movies's icon

    Ebert's Original 100 Great Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 28:0. Below is a subset of Roger Ebert's list of great films containing only those in his book "The Great Movies", published in 2002. The Apu Trilogy, Decalogue, and Up Documentaries are all broken out separately, hence more than 100 listings. An excerpt from Ebert's introduction to the book: "They are not 'the' 100 greatest films of all time, because all lists of great movies are a foolish attempt to codify works which must stand alone. But it's fair to say: If you want to make a tour of the landmarks of the first century of cinema, start here."
  3. Agatha Christie Film Adaptations's icon

    Agatha Christie Film Adaptations

    Favs/dislikes: 19:1. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Agatha Christie is the best-selling novelist of all time with over 4 billion copies in print. In 1955 Christie was the first recipient of the Grand Master Award, the highest honor of the Mystery Writers of America. There have been numerous television movies and series based on her work, but this list is restricted to feature films. Most follow the exploits of Hercule Poirot or Miss Jane Marple, and all are sorted by year of release.
  4. Ebert's Great Movies II's icon

    Ebert's Great Movies II

    Favs/dislikes: 19:0. Below is a subset of Roger Ebert's list of great films containing only those in his book "The Great Movies II", published in 2005. Originally I only listed three full-length feature films in lieu of Ebert's "Buster Keaton" chapter, but I have since brought this list in line with the official iCheck version of Ebert's Great Movies. Now Buster's body of work "from 1920 to 1929" is represented by selections 18-48 below. An excerpt from Ebert's introduction to the book: "One of my delights in these books ... has been to include movies not often cited as 'great' ... We go to different movies for different reasons, and greatness comes in many forms."
  5. Multiple Best Picture Honors's icon

    Multiple Best Picture Honors

    Favs/dislikes: 19:0. These are the films that have won more than one best picture award, usually by winning Best Picture in its country of origin, then Best Foreign Film in another. For the sake of this list, I limited the list of recognized industry bodies to those from Australia, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, India, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. In the interest of including all continents, I have made two exceptions to the industry award rule for the Gramado & Ouagadougou Film Festivals. I included award categories for feature-length animation, but omitted shorts and documentaries. I also included variations on Best Film and Best Foreign Film, such as BAFTA's Outstanding British Film, the Hong Kong award for Best Asian Film, and the Donatello for Best European Film. All titles are sorted first by number of honors, then year of release. The leader (with 7) is Pedro Almodovar's "All About My Mother", which won the Goya for Best Film plus the Oscar, BAFTA, Cesar, Lola, Donatello, and Guldbagge awards for Best Foreign Film.
  6. Most International Industry Awards's icon

    Most International Industry Awards

    Favs/dislikes: 17:0. Below are the films that have won over five "industry awards," defined as those awards selected by professionals in the movie business. I limited the pool of film industry bodies to those from the following countries: Australia (AACTA, formerly AFI), China (Golden Horse & Golden Rooster), France (Cesar), Germany (Lola), Great Britain (BAFTA), Italy (Donatello), India (Lotus), Japan (Awards of the Japanese Academy), Mexico (Ariel), Russia (Nika), Sweden (Guldbagge), and the United States (Oscar). All titles are sorted first by total, then by year of release. The leader (at 23) is "The Last Emperor" with 9 Oscars, 9 Donatellos, 3 BAFTAs, 1 Cesar, and an award from the Japanese Academy.
  7. Ebert's Great Movies III's icon

    Ebert's Great Movies III

    Favs/dislikes: 15:0. Below is a subset of Roger Ebert's list of great films containing only those in his book "The Great Movies III", published in 2010. An excerpt from Ebert's introduction to the book: "I believe great movies are a civilizing force. They allow us to empathize with those whose lives are different than our own. I like to say they open windows in our box of space and time. Here's a third book filled with windows."
  8. Entertainment Weekly's 100 Best Movie Soundtracks's icon

    Entertainment Weekly's 100 Best Movie Soundtracks

    Favs/dislikes: 13:0. Entertainment Weekly selected their definitive list of movie music, dubbed their "guide to the movie soundtracks that move us most."
  9. Time Magazine's All-TIME 100 Movies (Nominees)'s icon

    Time Magazine's All-TIME 100 Movies (Nominees)

    Favs/dislikes: 11:0. On May 23, 2004, TIME Magazine published online their list of "100 estimable films since TIME began, with the March 3, 1923 issue." Critics Richard Corliss and Richard Schickel collaborated on the list, and their original 100 films comprise selections 1-106 below. TIME subsequently added 20 more titles in February of 2005, and they are included in titles 107-134. In the process of making the original list, Corliss and Schickel had each started with a list of over 100 nominees. Of the 36 films on both lists, 31 made the original cut. Of the remaining five, one (All About My Mother) was included in the '05 addendum while the other four are items 135-138 below. Entries 139-234 represent the remaining nominees.
  10. Ebert's Great Movies IV's icon

    Ebert's Great Movies IV

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. Below is a subset of Roger Ebert's list of great films containing those not covered by books I, II, or III. May he rest in peace.
  11. Film Comment's 101 Film Score Milestones's icon

    Film Comment's 101 Film Score Milestones

    Favs/dislikes: 7:0. This Essential List of 101 Great Film Score Milestones (in chronological order) from 1933-2001 was compiled by John Caps in the November-December 2003 issue of Film Comment magazine in an article titled "Soundtracks 101 – Essential Movie Music: A Listener's Guide." The article also provided a brief history of film music in the introduction and further details on each of the choices. Facts and Commentary About the List: •The list was created to mark the 70th anniversary of the film score in 2003. • The list consisted of composed instrumental film scores (whether symphonic or electronic, classical or pop in style), not film musicals or song scores, from American and British films (English-language films). •These were films from the talkie era onwards (and recognizing that silent films were never silent). •The quality of a film often has nothing to do with the rating of its film score, e.g., Taras Bulba (1962, Waxman). •According to the author, the list was "representative rather than exhaustive; all of the scores in the list "contribute something memorable, something personal, to their films - and communicate one step further to us as music." •Predictably, one-fourth of the list was taken by the six giants of the Golden Age (Steiner, Waxman, Korngold, Newman, Rozsa, Herrmann). Yet the author also recognized some of the great, but seemingly forgotten, figures of the recent past: Laurence Rosenthal, Richard Rodney Bennett, Dave Grusin, David Shire, and Basil Poledouris.
  12. John Williams Soundtracks's icon

    John Williams Soundtracks

    Favs/dislikes: 7:0. "America's Composer" has earned 5 Oscars, 18 Grammys, 7 BAFTAs, and over 20 gold and platinum records, not to mention a record 45 Oscar nominations.
  13. The A List - National Society of Film Critics' 100 Essential Films's icon

    The A List - National Society of Film Critics' 100 Essential Films

    Favs/dislikes: 7:0. This is the Amazon book description for "The A List", published in 2002: People love movies. People love lists. So The A-List is a natural. While there are plenty of encyclopedic lists of films, this compulsively readable book of 100 essays—most written expressly for this volume-flags the best of the best as chosen by a consensus of the National Society of Film Critics. The Society is a world-renowned, marquee—name organization embracing some of America's most distinguished critics: more than forty writers who have national followings as well as devoted local constituencies in such major cities as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, and Minneapolis. But make no mistake about it: This isn't a collection of esoteric "critic's choice" movies. The Society has made its selections based on a film's intrinsic merits, its role in the development of the motion-picture art, and its impact on culture and society. Some of the choices are controversial. So are some of the omissions. It will be a jumping-off point for discussions for years to come. And since the volume spans all international films from the very beginning, it will act as a balance to recent guides dominated by films of the last two decades (hardly film's golden age). Here is a book that is definitely ready for its close-up.
  14. American Pulp Fiction Writers's icon

    American Pulp Fiction Writers

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. It was inside the pages of "Black Mask" magazine (1920-51) that Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe were born, and this pulp fiction playground went on to greatly influence American cinema. In fact, Tarantino's film "Pulp Fiction" was originally titled "Black Mask". While many writers flourished in this genre, the list below concentrates solely on the works of Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, and James Cain. I have endeavored to include all films based on their novels or stories, all screenplays, and anything derivative of their work. For instance, Hammett wrote only one "Thin Man" novel, but I have included all six films. While this list is heavy on noir and hard-boiled private eyes, it is not exclusively either. For example, "Black Bird" is here because it's a Sam Spade parody, not because of who wrote it, and 1982's "Hammett" is here because - honestly - what other list would it qualify for?
  15. Best of the Con Artist's icon

    Best of the Con Artist

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. under construction
  16. Best Texas Films's icon

    Best Texas Films

    Favs/dislikes: 3:0. This list is inspired by the article "No Country for Bad Movies" from the June, 2011 issue of Texas Monthly. Their panel was limited by criteria such as no documentaries, nothing made-for-TV, and each film "had to really feel as if it could only have been made in Texas". Their official results comprise listings 1-10 below, in no particular order. Everything after #10 is an at-large selection made by me based on looser guidelines, namely anything partially set in or partially filmed in Texas.
  17. Elmore Leonard Adaptations's icon

    Elmore Leonard Adaptations

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. all films based on either Leonard's novels, short stories, or screenplays
  18. Old Movie Stars Dance to Uptown Funk's icon

    Old Movie Stars Dance to Uptown Funk

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. Based on the YouTube video by Michael Binder, now with over 48M views.
  19. Based on Rudyard Kipling Stories's icon

    Based on Rudyard Kipling Stories

    Favs/dislikes: 1:0. Kipling was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist chiefly remembered for his celebration of British imperialism, his tales and poems of British soldiers in India, and his tales for children. In 1907 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and to date he remains its youngest recipient. Below is a list of films based on his work, though some rather loosely.
  20. Most Entertaining Disaster Movies's icon

    Most Entertaining Disaster Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 1:0. These are the most entertaining, the most fun, the greatest disaster movies ever made, ranked by movie experts and film fans alike. There is a long history of these kinds of movies in cinema - never to be taken too seriously, always slightly histrionic - for moviegoers who love to watch cities leveled and populations run screaming for their lives. This list includes films that center around a natural disaster, like a storm, as well as other kinds of catastrophe that might cause an apocalypse.
  21. Stacker's 110 Monumental Movies from Film History's icon

    Stacker's 110 Monumental Movies from Film History

    Favs/dislikes: 1:0. From the article "110 monumental movies from film history and why you need to see them". The priority in making this list was to create a holistic collection of significant films throughout history, meaning blockbuster epics and art-house favorites alike. Numerous academic sources were reviewed, as were a full slate of directors, genres/subgenres, decades, countries, trends, technical achievements, themes, narrative devices, and more.
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