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Comments 1 - 15 of 19

Limbesdautomne's avatar

Limbesdautomne

In Ray's films, the social ladder is broken when the family is separated, it's always going from bad to worse.

Read more in French on La Saveur des goûts amers.
4 years 1 month ago
greenhorg's avatar

greenhorg

Am I the only one unwelcomely distracted by the dad's hooters?
9 years 6 months ago
nicolaskrizan's avatar

nicolaskrizan

a fantastic debut
9 years 6 months ago
Tiago Costa's avatar

Tiago Costa

5 /5

Oh, the humanity!
5 years 2 months ago
IamZlatan's avatar

IamZlatan

masterpiece
10 years 3 months ago
masoko's avatar

masoko

masterpiece
10 years 7 months ago
arunraj's avatar

arunraj

masterpiece
10 years 9 months ago
maruf_ur's avatar

maruf_ur

Such a great movie in bangle.
7 years 3 months ago
Esnaider's avatar

Esnaider

I disagree with Indian Society
1 year 9 months ago
Rashed's avatar

Rashed

Masterpiece
2 years ago
ClassicLady's avatar

ClassicLady

Beautiful! Wonderful cinematography. Auntie was both appalling and beautiful at the same time.

Life can be so hard. Some people actually still have lives as bad as this. Count your blessings!
8 years ago
Siskoid's avatar

Siskoid

Satyajit Ray's debut directorial effort, Pather Panchali, is all the more remarkable for having been made by a director and camera operator that had never picked up a camera, with a cast of non-actors (indeed the central family is a real family, but for the older version of the daughter), and you can't tell. Beautiful photography, sensitive direction, a fresh reality that borders on documentary... The 1955 film focuses on a poor family in an equally poor village in the Bengal region of India, but this is really a mother's story, and her struggles with trouble-making children, a lazy husband, a mooching ancient aunt, a decaying house, and the specter of tragedy on the horizon. As we get to know the family, we also discover that part of the world. Ray gives no indication that he ever meant Western audiences to see this, so traditions are not explained, just shown with the assurance that the public will understand. It gives it an anthropological bent from our perspective, and an immersive feeling. Pather Panchali means Song of the Little Road - small human moments exalted to cinematic greatness - and it's a slow road too, less narrative (read: plot) and more portrait. When Ray gets to the end, I felt like he did so definitively, then added an epilogue, which gave us an even better ending. Then another epilogue that I didn't need, but it sets up sequels in which Apu, the boy, grows up and stars. Call me intrigued.
2 years 3 months ago
satyanash's avatar

satyanash

Good Lord, this is what you call a masterpiece. Take a bow, Ray.
8 years 3 months ago
Rohit's avatar

Rohit

A true masterpiece
11 years 1 month ago
devanshu257's avatar

devanshu257

“Pather panchali” Directed by Satyajit Ray, is a rare accomplishment that is known for its originality, deeply moving and soul stirring approach. It is the story of a boy named apu living in the village ready to explore nature and the world around him.It feels so natural that it doesn’t feel like a movie, and you are attached to the apu and family the moment you saw them. Every frame of the movie felt like painting and you want to be lost in it.It tells us about the nature that gives us everything and also takes something from us and still the journey goes on.
5 years 7 months ago

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