Timec's comments

Comments 1 - 25 of 234

Timec's avatar

Timec

"If it can't be any other way, let's set fire to the house."
2 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

“Into the Woods” has always been a bit of an oddball in the Broadway canon, primarily for its sharply dichotomous first and second acts and for Sondheim’s typically atypical compositional style. It’s a strange and messy show that’s always going to divide audiences—there’s a lot of singing, and a lot of darkness. In short, this is tricky material to adapt to film, and Disney deserves kudos for keeping most of the sharp edges of the original material intact.

This isn’t a great movie—visually, it’s quite drab, and some of the omissions (particularly in the transition between the film’s more traditional first half and darker second half) make the pacing seem a bit choppy. Marshall does a serviceable job adapting the material (partially redeeming himself for his butchery of “Nine”), but one can’t help but wonder what a truly visionary director might have been able to do with this complex, subversive, messy material.

With all that said, there’s a lot to like here, and it’s still a solid adaptation of middle-tier Sondheim (and, in my book, “weaker” Sondheim is still better than most things out there.) The ensemble is excellent (even James Corden is tolerable), with Emily Blunt as the Baker’s Wife a particular standout. Most of the actors can actually sing, which is always a plus in a movie musical. Most importantly, it’s funny and moving in the right spots, and the profundity and beauty of Sondheim’s insanely clever and wise (though occasionally more strained than in his best works) lyrics and Lapine’s script are still there for those willing to listen.
6 years 11 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

For the record: There are a few films here that may not seem like comedies to many - namely "American Psycho" and some of the Eastern European animated shorts. The author explains that he included them in the book because of their strong satirical/parodical elements.
7 years 5 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

bobbybrown - I double checked, and it is the 1923 version that is mentioned in the book. I removed it from the list though, since it's lost.
7 years 5 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

I've updated the list based on the revisions made to the official article on the BFI site.
7 years 10 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

For anyone who has evidence of other Kubrick faves, the person who compiled the list is taking suggestions on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/kubrickfaves

He's apparently going to update the article on the BFI site occasionally as he finds more sources - as soon as a film is added to the master list there, I'll update the list here.
8 years 3 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Ok, I think I've added all their officially announced titles.
8 years 5 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

A wonderful film. Not because I feel I have any particularly deep understanding of it (if there is anything to "get,") but simply because the two hours I spent in the theater were incredibly enjoyable and refreshing. I really love the way music and movement (of people and of the camera) and narration work together in his recent films to create a sort of feature-length film "symphony" or "dance" (yes, I realize that sounds hopelessly pretentious, but...)

I totally understand people who dislike/hate Malick's recent output, but I for one am really glad he's still working and making this kind of movie.
8 years 7 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Thanks, Mr. Ebert. I'll see you at the movies.
8 years 8 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Inconsistent and spotty, like most of these Disney package films. However, a lot of the music is good and there are a few really lovely segments - particularly the (too short) first and the energetic second.

Also, that last segment is the weirdest damn thing I've ever seen.
8 years 8 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Really? It took me a while to get used to the incongruous computer-generated characters, but overall I found a lot of the animation to be quite beautiful.
8 years 8 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

I couldn't find anything by her called "Le reveur," but I just added "Jacques Rivette - Le veilleur."
8 years 10 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Don't know if subs have appeared since Monty's post, but the UK label Masters of Cinema will be releasing this on Blu-ray next April.
8 years 11 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

I think claims that this is cynical Oscar bait are misplaced.

Like it or hate it (I personally found it to be a very stressful, but somewhat enjoyable experience), it strikes me a deeply sincere and personal film about the dynamics of certain kinds of families - and one that lacks most of the traits of so-called "Oscar bait."
9 years ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

I thought this was significantly better than the first, with better imagery and a plot that actually made me interested in the mythology of the world.

Still a bit too gross for me, though.
9 years 1 month ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Could you update this to include the new "Frankenweenie"?
9 years 1 month ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

chemosh - Ahh, there's nothing like the snobbish condescension of anti-film-snob snobs.

(With that said, I'm fairly excited to start going through this list - though the musical and documentary lists are the priorities right now.)
9 years 3 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

I'm super excited for all of these, but I'm especially happy to finally get a good musical list and two good documentary lists!
9 years 3 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Only one documentary ("Kokoda Front Line!") made the top 100, and no short films. The highest ranking documentaries that didn't make the list include:

Cane Toads: An Unnatural History
Eternity (Lawrence Johnston, 1995)
For Love or Money (Megan McMurchy, et. al, 1983)
Two Laws (Allesandro Cavadini & Carolyn Strachan, 1981)
Bingo Bridesmaids & Braces (Gillian Armstrong, 1988)
Bodywork (David Caesar, 1989)
I'll Be Home for Christmas (Brian McKenzie, 1984) Pearls and Savages" (Frank Hurley, 1921)
Front Line (David Bradbury, 1980)
Desert People (Ian Dunlop, 1967)

The highest rated short films include:

Passionless Moments (Jane Campion, 1984)
Night Cries: A Rural Tragedy (Tracey Moffatt, 1990)
Nice Coloured Girls (Tracey Moffatt, 1987)
Peel (Jane Campion, 1982)
Camera Natura (Ross Gibson, 1985)
A Girl's Own Story (Jane Campion, 1983)
Violence in the Cinema ... Part 1 (George Miller, 1972)
From the Tropics to the Snow (Richard Mason & Jack Lee, 1964)
Stations (Jackie McKimmie, 1983)
Dot and the Kangaroo (Yoram Gross, 1977)
Leisure (Bruce Petty, 1977)
Queensland (John Ruane, 1976)
Only the Brave (Ana Kokkinos, 1995)
Feathers (John Ruane, 1987)
Lover Boy (Geoffrey Wright, 1989)

"Highest ranked films which offered variations in cinema form:"

In This Life's Body (Corinne & Arthur Cantrill, 1984)
My Life Without Steve (Gillian Leahy, 1986)
Mystical Rose (Michael Lee, 1975)
Serious Undertakings (Helen Grace, 1983)
A Song of Air (Merilee Bennett, 1987)
This Woman is Not a Car (Margaret Dodd, 1983)
The Lead Dress (Virginia Murray, 1984)
Palisade (Laurie McInnes, 1987)
9 years 4 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

It's not among my favorite Ghibli films - and I could have done without the painfully saccharine song at the end - but it's still pretty wonderful.
9 years 4 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

An invaluable document of one of the most important (and best) musicals of modern Broadway.

As someone who has listened to the album a million times, it was especially thrilling to see the faces behind the voices. But even if you're not interested in the show, it's fascinating to see all the work that goes into creating a cast album.
9 years 6 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

For those who haven't seen this yet, Criterion will be giving it - along with two other Fejos films - its first ever (afaik) official home video release in August.
9 years 6 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Fixed, plus updated with their most recent announcements.
9 years 6 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Wow, this is only 87 minutes but it really put me through the emotional wringer. I love the Dardenne brothers, and this is their best film since the The Son, in my opinion.
9 years 7 months ago
Timec's avatar

Timec

Big A2 - Sorry for the confusion - I was not stating my own opinion, but was responding to Pickman's statement that Coppola's version was the "first viewable version" of the story. My first comment was kind of pointless, but just a bit of unnecessary sarcasm in response to an opinion I very strongly disagree with.

To be clear: I really don't like Coppola's film, and I think there were several good or great versions of "Dracula" made before his film, including this one. Apparently Pickman disagrees (which is his right.)
9 years 8 months ago

Showing items 1 – 25 of 234

View comments