Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

  1. Entertainment Weekly's 25 Films "Just Too Beloved to Ignore"'s icon

    Entertainment Weekly's 25 Films "Just Too Beloved to Ignore"

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. An additional 25 more films were listed in the book Entertainment Weekly's 100 Greatest Movies of All Time and were included in the book's appendix in alphabetical order. Supposedly, they were "just too beloved to ignore." (The 100 Greatest Movies list is here: http://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/entertainment+weeklys+100+greatest+movies+of+all+time/marchosias/)
  2. Entertainment Weekly's Essential Movies Kids Must Experience (Before They Turn 13)'s icon

    Entertainment Weekly's Essential Movies Kids Must Experience (Before They Turn 13)

    Favs/dislikes: 6:0. There are people out there who have never seen The Princess Bride. They walk among us, holding down jobs, contributing to society, and generally living happy, semi-fulfilled lives. But whisper a perfectly-timed “mawage” in their direction during a wedding, and the resulting blank stare or awkward chuckle will expose an inconceivable pop-cultural blind spot. Someone failed them when they were growing up. In many ways it’s too late for them, but we can still save the next generation. The 55 Essential Movies Kids Must Experience (Before They Turn 13) is a starting point. This isn’t a list of the 55 “best” kids movies, nor a compendium of hidden gems. Rather, it’s a survival-guide syllabus of films that we all need to know to be able to speak the same pop-cultural language, listed in order by when they might be best introduced. It starts with a film that is a perfect introduction to the cinematic universe and ends with one that is an ideal capper before graduating into the world of PG-13 and R movies—and the age when kids begin to make their own theater decisions. These are the cinematic building blocks for future film connoisseurs, movie-literate enthusiasts who can gracefully segue from a George Bailey impression into a spirited debate over whether Han Solo shot first. The important stuff.
  3. Entertainment Weekly's 21 Great Crime Thrillers's icon

    Entertainment Weekly's 21 Great Crime Thrillers

    Favs/dislikes: 7:1.
  4. Entertainment Weekly's 100 All-Time Greatest Movies (2013)'s icon

    Entertainment Weekly's 100 All-Time Greatest Movies (2013)

    Favs/dislikes: 14:0. In their July 5/12, 2013 double issue, Entertainment Weekly published their lists of the 100 all-time greatest movies, television series, albums, and books. Here is their list of 100 all-time greatest movies. (Note: Olympia, at #84, includes both Part I and Part II. Both parts are included in the list.)
  5. Entertainment Weekly's 100 Greatest Movies of All Time's icon

    Entertainment Weekly's 100 Greatest Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 14:0. Entertainment Weekly's 100 Greatest Movies of All Time, a hardcover guide published in 1999 by Time-Life Inc. and written by senior editor Ty Burr, celebrated films that can't be forgotten, that "help us understand and define who we are." The final list was whittled down from a preliminary collection of 500 nominated choices, excluding short films, documentaries, or any movies from the previous five years (from 1994 onward). The list deliberately corrected the American Film Institute's most glaring omissions - Preston Sturges, Buster Keaton, and Ernst Lubitsch, and added some of the best foreign films - from Fellini, Truffaut, and Kurosawa. According to the book's introduction, the most represented male star was James Stewart (with five films); Cary Grant, Robert De Niro and Alec Guinness had four films each, and Janet Leigh had three films. The most represented director was Alfred Hitchcock (with four films), and there were three films each from Michael Curtiz, David Lean, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and Billy Wilder. (The book also includes 25 additional films "too beloved to ignore." This list is here: http://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/entertainment+weeklys+25+films+just+too+beloved+to+ignore/marchosias/)
  6. Entertainment Weekly’s Top 50 Cult Movies's icon

    Entertainment Weekly’s Top 50 Cult Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 28:0. Published in 2003, Entertainment Weekly Magazine described their Top 50 Cult Movies thusly: "most died at the box office, some of them horribly. Mangled and despised, they were re-animated on video. And now they compose our cultural Esperanto, a subliminal vocabulary of vaguely subversive images, ideas, and phrases that we continue to obsess over and dissect at parties, around water coolers, in bars, over the blaring banalities of the mainstream media din. They are Cult Movies...So if you take your dead evil and your buckaroos banzai-ed, pour yourself a tall glass of Kool-Aid and peruse this list…" Note: Reader response to the original list was so great, that EW subsequently annexed their list with 11 “readers’ choice” picks. Why 11? Well, it's one longer, isn't it …?
  7. 50 Best High School Movies's icon

    50 Best High School Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 31:0. A Entertainment Weekly list of the 50 Best High School Movies in their September 15, 2006 issue.
  8. Entertainment Weekly’s The New Classics's icon

    Entertainment Weekly’s The New Classics

    Favs/dislikes: 32:0. Chosen by Entertainment Weekly in 2008, these are their 100 best films from the “past 25 years” (1983 to 2008).
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