Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

  1. Dexter's icon

    Dexter

    Favs/dislikes: 17:10. Dexter is an American television series broadcast on the premium cable channel Showtime in the United States. The series is based on characters created by Jeff Lindsay for his "Dexter" series of novels. It was first broadcast on October 1, 2006. The series follows the life of protagonist Dexter Morgan (Michael C. Hall), a Miami Metro Police Department blood pattern analyst with a double life. While investigating murders in the homicide division, Dexter hunts and kills murderers and criminals who have escaped the justice system.
  2. The Twilight Zone's icon

    The Twilight Zone

    Favs/dislikes: 15:1. Rod Serling's anthology series, aired between 1959 and 1964.
  3. South Park episodes's icon

    South Park episodes

    Favs/dislikes: 12:4. A list of all regular South Park episodes, because some tend to be hard to find due to inconsistent naming.
  4. Game of Thrones's icon

    Game of Thrones

    Favs/dislikes: 8:0. Game of Thrones is an American medieval fantasy television series created for HBO by David Benioff and D. B. Weiss. It is an adaptation of A Song of Ice and Fire, George R. R. Martin's series of fantasy novels, the first of which is titled A Game of Thrones.
  5. Six Feet Under's icon

    Six Feet Under

    Favs/dislikes: 3:0. Six Feet Under is an American drama television series created and produced by Alan Ball. It premiered on the premium cable network HBO in the United States on June 3, 2001 and ended on August 21, 2005, spanning five seasons and 63 episodes.
  6. The 20 Best Science Fiction TV Series's icon

    The 20 Best Science Fiction TV Series

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. I love to obsess over a show's mysteries and the theories sparked by them that elevate the viewing experience. Lost was the show that launched a thousand theories. At its best, Lost was magical like nothing before or since. And I've never heard anything as moving as Michael Giacchino's deathless score for Lost. Whether a mystery box or a Pandora's box, Lost began with an openness to potential scientific explanations. But as it closed the door to science fiction and opened the window to its own magical rules of fantasy, we got a philosophical allegory about what the island symbolized, leaving much of it open to interpretation. Lost showed that love is the biggest mystery of all, an act in which we create something together. And all we need in order to create is our unfettered imagination, the unpredictability of inspiration and the evolved conscious choice between futures that can't be foreseen until we imagine them. While the island in Lord of the Flies stands for the corrupted material world, the island in Lost symbolizes the spiritual world where atonement and redemption is possible. With a beginning hinting that all that happens means something, a middle asking if meaning is an illusion, the end tells us that love is our constant whose meaning we can't fathom. As for why The OA without doubt is the best series right now, here's a quote from Part I: "It's about . . . the play, cast of two, setting, classroom, over many dimensions through time. . . . This dimension is crumbling to violence and pettiness and greed." And in Part II, Karim is the dopest cat ever, especially when he says, "Get off my boat." Followed by OA saying, "I'm asking you to imagine that reality is stranger and more complicated than you or I could possibly know. And sometimes we get glimpses of it, in dreams or in déjà vu." I'm happy to say that Part II of The OA blew me away, its ending one of the best I've ever had the joy to see, to me as fine as that of Planet of the Apes, Coherence, Interstellar and Dark City. Though stumbling at times up to the grand last scenes of its acrobatic storytelling, it's the most riveting story of this dimension. I've never been part of a more passionate love for a series than what I've felt and seen expressed for this story. A story that is revolutionary in how it offers adventure and fight for survival without resorting to violence, showing us that our lunacy of war was who we were before our species matured, not who we are. (Honorable mentions: The Expanse, Star Trek: Discovery, Black Mirror, Extant, Regenesis, Colony, Fringe, Revolution, Ascension, Falling Skies, Killjoys, Dark Matter, Lost in Space.)
  7. Gorro's Top TV-series's icon

    Gorro's Top TV-series

    Favs/dislikes: 0:0.
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