Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

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  1. 500 Top Western Movies's icon

    500 Top Western Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 43:0. A list for the die-hard western fan! This long and diverse list of great western movies is largely derived from a list found on Cinemacom.com entitled "500 & More - A Western Lover's List". However, Cinemacom's list is heavily slanted toward the traditional western and admittedly excludes all western comedies and many good spaghetti westerns. I wanted to create a more balanced list and so I cross referenced Cinemacom's list against IMDB user ratings in the western genre and made some thoughtful modifications which add some diversity. If you love westerns I hope this list will help you explore the genre.
  2. Onderhond's Top Movies's icon

    Onderhond's Top Movies

    Favs/dislikes: 22:6. My top 270: http://www.onderhond.com/movies100/
  3. Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film's icon

    Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film

    Favs/dislikes: 20:0. In October 2013, the British Film Institute unveiled an exhibition chronicling the history of dark and macabre films. In an ambitious project, the BFI unveiled a collection of a large number of films spanning four categories, bringing these films to British cinemas over a four month period. Films are arranged chronologically by theme. The Four Parts: - Monstrous (1-26) - The Dark Arts (27-48) - Haunted (49-71) - Love is a Devil (72-99) Although this exhibition includes a large number of plays, professional talks, documentaries, television series' and shorts, this list contains only the feature films presented in the exhibition.
  4. Rateyourmusic.com 200 Surrealist Films's icon

    Rateyourmusic.com 200 Surrealist Films

    Favs/dislikes: 11:0. Top 200 surrealist films of all time according to members of Rateyourmusic.com 163. The Midnight Parasites (Yoji Kuri, 1972) is missing from imdb.
  5. The Hollywood Romantic Comedy's icon

    The Hollywood Romantic Comedy

    Favs/dislikes: 9:0. From the book by Leger Grindon (2011). The filmography is arranged by a chronological progression of themes: Transition to Sound (1930-1933) Screwball (1934-1942) World war II and the Homefront (1942-1946) Post-War: Melancholy and Reconciliation (1947-1953) The Comedies of Seduction: The Playboy, the Gold Digger, and the Virgin (1953-1966) The transition through the counter-culture (1967-1976) Nervous Romance (1977-1987) Reaffirmation of Romance (1986-1996) Grotesque and Ambivalent (1997-present)
  6. Top 50 Films of Queer Cinema's icon

    Top 50 Films of Queer Cinema

    Favs/dislikes: 5:0. The top 50 queer cinema films as voted on by users of Rateyourmusic.com's film page.
  7. Hyperlink movies's icon

    Hyperlink movies

    Favs/dislikes: 4:0. Hyperlink cinema is a term coined by author Alissa Quart, who used the term in her review of the film Happy Endings (2005) for the film journal Film Comment in 2005. Film critic Roger Ebert popularized the term when reviewing the film Syriana in 2005. These films are not hypermedia and do not have actual hyperlinks, but are multilinear in a more metaphorical sense. Playing with time and characters personal history, plot twists, interwoven storylines between multiple characters, jumping between the beginning and end (flashback and flashforward) are also elements.
  8. American Gangster Cinema's icon

    American Gangster Cinema

    Favs/dislikes: 3:0. The filmography listed in the book American Gangster Cinema: From Little Caesar to Pulp Fiction (2002) by Fran Mason
  9. Fantasy Filmfest Nights 2016's icon

    Fantasy Filmfest Nights 2016

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0.
  10. Paste's 100 Best Western Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Western Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. List published in June 2016 Is the Western the most American of movie genres? You can make an argument for the Western film’s internationality on the names of the directors who have contributed to its iconography: You have your John Fords and your Anthony Manns, your Sam Peckinpahs and your Samuel Fullers, but over in Europe you also have filmmakers like Sergio Leone, Enzo G. Castellari and Sergio Corbucci, among many, many others, as authors of Western offshoots that influence filmmakers even today. (And of course there are those great entries in the Western canon that were lifted wholesale from Akira Kurosawa’s filmography.) Hell, let’s flash from the Western’s glory days to the last decade, where Kim Jee-woon and Takashi Miike have put their individual stamps on its tropes and motifs. For these reasons, there’s certainly an argument to made that the Western is truly “universal.” But no matter where Western movies are made, no matter what subgenre classifications they are individually accorded, and no matter who makes them, the films always engage with symbols, eras and images that are quintessentially “American.” The Western is the domain of the cowboy, the solitary hero. It’s a place where law and chaos are ever in conflict with one another and where the difference between survival and death usually comes down to who is faster on the draw. It’s a testament to the rich, awesome power of the Western as a narrative mode that filmmakers from around the planet have found stories worth telling within its purview, but even the Italian maestros simply added their own unique (and significant) flourishes to a cinematic tradition that is American in its DNA. Maybe it’s more accurate to say that they made the Western their own. Spaghetti Westerns are, after all, a cousin to American Westerns in terms of style, content, themes and morality. The Italian Westerns are literally gritty where American Westerns are polished and clean; they deal in ambiguity instead of black and white. The average Spaghetti Western hero looks like a total bastard next to the clean-cut heroes of American Westerns, who uphold all of the best and most commonly accepted standards of heroism as we know them. Who would you rather save the day for you? Will Kane, or the man with no name? There’s a divide separating the Westerns made by Europeans and those shot by Americans, but if you can sort these movies out by their varying approaches, you can’t keep them all from standing under one umbrella. (A better point of debate: Did the Spaghetti Western become a thing in 1958 or 1964?) Like the wide and sprawling landscapes that are so much a part of the Western’s character as a genre, the Western itself is a big, open canvas for storytelling of all stripes. With that in mind, we here at Paste set about collecting Westerns from all over the map and across the ages to assemble our picks for the 100 best Western films of all time. —Andy Crump
  11. Paste's 100 Best Superhero Movies of All Time's icon

    Paste's 100 Best Superhero Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 1:1. Published in January 2017 Two things quickly become evident when putting together a list of the 100 Best Superhero Movies of All Time. First, this is the Golden Age for such films, a decade where technology, long-unrequited fandom and surging popular awareness have all combined to thrill moviegoers and make Hollywood billions of dollars. Second, it’s still fair to say that most superhero films are not that good. There’s no real contradiction at play here. The niche just lacks the pedigree of its fellow movie genres. Though superhero comic books may have started to make a dint in popular culture 75 years ago (give or take), technology only crossed over from hindrance to enabling force in the last 20 years or so. As a result, while curating a 100 Best Westerns of All Time or 100 Best Documentaries of All Time list requires the exclusion of arguably good films to select the best 100—for superhero movies? The pickings get slim after 40. In fact, the real challenge for this list was choosing amongst the dreck (some of it beloved dreck!) that would fill out the bottom half. It turns out it’s much easier to argue for or against a top 10 film’s exact placement (and frankly, compelling arguments could be made for almost any of our top 5 as deserving the #1 position), than weighing the relative “merits” of Masters of the Universe, Swamp Thing and Elektra. This also means the bottom half of this list will change swiftly compared to, say, The Best B-Movies of All Time. In fact, it’s a safe assumption if there are 15 superhero movies in the next three years, at least 14 of them will knock numbers 86-99 off this list. (Our #100 is a bit of a wild card.) Finally, some criteria. To be considered for this list, a film must possess at least two of the following three qualities: 1) It must involve costumed shenanigans, 2) It must involve a superpowered protagonist and/or 3) the protagonist must exist in a world where the supernatural/extraordinary is demonstrably present. These criteria are why meta-commentary films like Kick-Ass and Super are not on this list. And it’s also why some films with pulpy characters like Zorro, Tarzan and Conan are not, while others like The Phantom are. (Zane’s costume combined with the Skulls of Touganda do the trick.) Admittedly, the lines gets blurry. Also absent from this list is any consideration of foreign superhero films. That’s not because some are not worthy—especially given the movie quality issue mentioned at the top—it’s just an area we’d rather get better versed in before pouring into this list. Next year, perhaps. The three Matrix films were counted as a single entry in the source list.
  12. Poliziotteschi's icon

    Poliziotteschi

    Favs/dislikes: 1:0. Poliziotteschi films constitute a subgenre of crime and action film that emerged in Italy in the late 1960s and reached the height of their popularity in the 1970s. Poliziotteschi films are also known as poliziottesco, Italo-crime, Euro-crime, poliziesco or simply Italian crime films.
  13. 2012 Challenge's icon

    2012 Challenge

    Favs/dislikes: 0:2. Short and Sweet Overview: Watch 365 films in the year 2012.
  14. Attack of the 50 Foot Monster Mania's icon

    Attack of the 50 Foot Monster Mania

    Favs/dislikes: 0:0. A list of films featured in the 1999 documentary Attack of the 50 Foot Monster Mania.
  15. Films Set In A Single Location's icon

    Films Set In A Single Location

    Favs/dislikes: 0:0. My favorite genre of film, mansion movies/films set in a single location. Here is the best of the best!
  16. Time Out's 50 Best Gangster Movies of All Time's icon

    Time Out's 50 Best Gangster Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 0:0. Call it an offer you can't refuse, a Sicilian message or a pair of cement shoes: The gangster film has an iron-clad lock on the hearts of movie lovers. Some of Hollywood's finest exports are crime sagas, and the indie and foreign-film worlds have followed suit with classics of their own. Gritty or romantic, coolly silent or loaded with tough talk, these movies are five-course feasts, heavy on the red sauce—and make plenty of room for the most notorious mobsters from Chicago, like Al Capone, who appears on our list more than once. If we've forgotten a movie in our countdown, let us know (but we have the corner table, so we'll see you coming). List published March 2015
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