Charts: Lists

This page shows you the list charts. By default, the movies are ordered by how many times they have been marked as a favorite. However, you can also sort by other information, such as the total number of times it has been marked as a dislike.

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  1. Ronny's Top 99 Arthouse Films's icon

    Ronny's Top 99 Arthouse Films

    Favs/dislikes: 22:0. There are way too many arthouse / surreal / artistic films out there to know where the hell to start. Even if you've watched them for years you can still get lost in the searching. One of the reasons why we started Film Bizarro was to highlight the weird for the masses, and while I think we have done that, we've also gotten wider. That's why I wanted to make this list - to make a list that focuses on only the good of the weird. I decided to call it my "Favorite Arthouse Films" because I think "Arthouse" is a word that sums it up perfectly even though the origins of the word might not apply to 100%. I've tried to write a good but short description for each film - it's just too much work to write a full review for each of these so bare with me. There are some fascinating films in this list and sometimes words just doesn't do it, at least not with my limited vocabulary, so don't judge them solely on what I have to say. If you find a film of interest: watch it! I decided to only include 3 movies from the same director, otherwise some directors would take up too much space. This list consists of films that are my favorites, I'm not claiming they are the best. Simply being weird doesn't do it!! When I decided to make this list I took it upon myself to watch a few films I have missed out on - LOTS and LOTS of films didn't make it, but some of them did. This of course means that in 6 months maybe the list would've looked slightly different, as I watch movies all the time. This documents the time when it was made, and I assure you that's good enough! Five of the movies are missing from IMDb. Missing from IMDb: #78. Tephrasect (Justin Curfman, 2004) #68. Ass (Usama Alshaibi, 2001) #61. I Never Left The White Room (Michael Todd Schneider, 2007) #30. ...and then i helped (Michael Todd Schneider, 2010) #15. Convulsion Expulsion (Usama Alshaibi, 2003)
  2. Top Ten Experiments In Horror's icon

    Top Ten Experiments In Horror

    Favs/dislikes: 10:0. Cinema is commonly thought of as a medium that brings our dreams into waking consciousness. And our nightmares. It cannot be argued that film has gravitated toward capturing the horrific ever since its inception. The Horror genre purposefully experiments with our fears and fear comes in many forms, as we all know. Most film makers tend to take somewhat formulaic approaches to style and narrative; however, through different manipulations of sight and sound, some attempt to involve the viewer into the presentation, beyond just observing it. These strange and frightening dreamscapes often attempt to question our perceptions - in both a visual and intellectual sense. Unfortunately, they are rarely met with much commercial acceptance or success. Nevertheless, many of the elements employed are often highly innovative and later copied by the mainstream. Look no further than 1929's impenetrable yet fascinating Un Chien Andalou for sixteen of the most peculiar minutes ever compiled, if you have any doubts. That opening eyeball scene alone is worth the watch, I assure you. Audiences of that time had seen nothing like it, but viewers today can easily spot the film's integrity. In accordance, here I'd like to focus on some of the most unconventional, surreal, abstract, ambiguous or indulgent works to ever be made. Where nothing is as it seems. Or is it? It is within these vague perimeters that I offer ten of the most compelling experimental horror films ever made. (Not complete yet. Some entries seem to be missing from IMDB). Missing from IMDb: In Stillness I Lie (Pepper Negron, 2009)
  3. The 25 Most Disturbing Horror Movies of All Time's icon

    The 25 Most Disturbing Horror Movies of All Time

    Favs/dislikes: 7:0. The term disturbing is defined as something that can be troubling mentally or emotionally. It is something that is upsetting and may even make you physically ill. That being said, the term can be considered rather subjective. As human beings, we all have had our own unique experiences that over time have molded our characteristics, behavior, feelings, and personal judgments. So something that is disturbing to one person may not be disturbing to another. That being said, this is list of twenty five films from the horror genre that are disturbing or could be considered to be disturbing. The horror genre is the most likely place that we are going to find imagery that will shock and disturb the audience, featuring tales of true crime, serial killers, slashers, rape and revenge, torture, scenes of horrific gore, and the list can go on forever. Within the genre and its many subgenres, they can take us into the deepest and darkest corridors of humanity. Places that we hope to never witness or become a part of. It is those types of events that can be potentially disturbing. This list contains a little bit of everything, with at least one film from every decade between 1966 and 2016 and at least one from America, Serbia, Germany, Austria, Italy, Mexico, Hong Kong, Japan, Spain, China, France, Sweden and Argentina. It is a varied collection of horror pictures; with some between being critically hailed, many being labeled as exploitative and controversial, and some being banned in various parts of the world. [Author’s Note: This list is not meant to be an all inclusive list or a best of list; it is simply twenty five horror movies that may be disturbing.]
  4. J-Horror: An Alternative Guide's icon

    J-Horror: An Alternative Guide

    Favs/dislikes: 2:0. There's a lot more to Japanese horror than the vengeful, lank-haired spook-girls of Ring, Ju-on and their legion of imitators. Sure, the West may have only recently woken up to its charms, but J-horror has been around for a mighty long time. The first Japanese novel, The Tale of Genji – now nearly a millennium old – is positively packed with ghosts and gruesome revenge. Noh and Kabuki are some of the most haunted theatrical traditions on Earth, and Edo period playwrights were constantly fighting to outdo one another in the gore, murder and supernatural vengeance stakes. Pretty much as soon as the first motion picture camera came off the boat here, someone picked it up and started making horror movies. Jizo the Spook [Bake Jizo] and Resurrection of a Corpse [Shinin no Sosei], both filmed in 1898, predate Nosferatu (1922) by decades. Since then, Japanese horror has come to us in a number of guises: sometimes grotesque, sometimes scary, sometimes erotic, funny or even beautiful. Let's take a look at a few examples...
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